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Opinion

  • Every year around graduation time, I like to share a message to all graduating students from President George Bush Sr. On the day he was sworn in, he gave the following advice to all young people:

  • Last week, I went to Municipal Court to answer to my ticket for speeding on Bridge Street, going 34 miles in a 15-mph zone around 8 a.m. on a weekday.

    It was my second citation in recent times. I also got a ticket a few months ago for exceeding the speed limit on the Highlands University campus. Then, Judge Eddie Trujillo gave me a $29 court fee and deferred my fine if I kept my nose clean for a month.

  • With great thankfulness and appreciation, we are pleased to announce that the free Tuesday evening meal is being started again.  Thanks to Mayor Ortiz and Theresa Lopez at the Las Vegas Senior Citizen Center, we are being given the use of the Senior Citizen Center to offer this service to the community.

  • Recently, while at Highlands University, I found out that Dr. Jane Goodall was visiting Las Vegas. I am a retired chemist and this was exciting news.  

    When I got to the Plaza Hotel, Dr. Goodall was viewing the science exhibits of the students from Los Niños school. I have to agree with Dr. Goodall in that the exhibits were very well done. I had been a science fair judge for 10 years and have seen few science projects done that well by students of any age in public school.

  • Recently, I got a wake-up call from individuals on my e-mail contact list. It appears that an Internet social network named Que Pasa informed my friends that I had invited them to sign on to the group.

    Not true! Anyhow, I hurriedly informed my key contacts that they should be wary because I feared that my contact list had been hijacked to recruit them; in short time, I received responses, and it appears many had been contacted in my name.  

  • NMHU's Student Support Services would like to thank the following merchants for their generous donations for our annual Awards Banquet on April 22. Our award recipients were very appreciative of your kind contributions:

  • Thumbs UP for ... NO FENCING. The feud between the Storrie Lake Water Users Association and the state appears to have subsided, with a three-year agreement having been reached between the two. The most obvious consequence is that the lake will now open for shoreline fishing this summer and there won’t be any prohibitive and unsightly fences going up.

  • The vituperation and enmity so energetically and continually focused on Barack Obama by a significant — and loud — portion of our national citizenry has made me “curiouser and curiouser,” especially because I expected this to wane after he won the presidency in such undeniable and resounding fashion.  

  • Remember, la gente de Mora, that the oil and gas that lies beneath your land is worth hundreds of billions of dollars to the greedy oil companies. The oil representatives will come to you with their mentiras about how much good they are going to do for you. You must understand que por los poquito centavos you receive you will be giving away tu salud, la amistad, y sus tierras.  When all the money you have received is gone, your kids, your grandkids, and possibly yourselves van andar por las calles.

  • Yes, there was $55,500 appropriated for Cinder Road Drainage Improvements in 2006. The money was to be spent on increasing the size of the culvert crossing on Cinder Road just north of Palo Verde (a city drainage ditch/structure).

    The appropriation went to the city of Las Vegas, appropriation numbers 06-2086 and 05-2306.

    The county on several occasions approached the city to complete the work as it was designed and to be completed. This was done in anticipation of the work the county will be completing on the Cinder Pedestrian and Bicycle Path.

  • Concerning online comments: Do you know the difference between the finest newspaper in the country, the New York Times, and our very own homegrown Las Vegas Optic?

    Both have journalists struggling to report facts accurately; both provide editorial opinions that enlighten their subscribers. And unfortunately, they’re both facing considerable financial hurdles due to America’s changing reading habits.

  • In New Mexico, governing bodies can meet behind closed doors only for a few limited purposes. Chief among them are to discuss personnel matters, pending or threatened litigation, union negotiations, or the purchase or sale of real estate.

    We have to trust our elected representatives to strictly follow the state Open Meetings Act. Unfortunately, it’s hard to hold them accountable because we can’t listen in when the doors are closed.

  • “The reason I stopped you is that I noticed your license plate is lacking a comma between the word ‘Go’ and ‘Cowboys.’ Please exit the vehicle and provide proof you are in this country legally.”

    “Well, I, er, intended to insert that comma today, sir.”

    The dialogue was part of my dream, or rather, obsession now that I realize what a difference a plate makes — 24 little dollars. But that license plate, an official Highlands University prestige tag, has become a preoccupation and an attention-getter.

  • I asked my grandmother Rosalie Regensberg what would make her run from office again. She replied that with age also comes widsom and experience. Both of these virtues are something you do not learn in books. She also has other concerns.

  • Las Vegas Mayor Alfonso Ortiz is right to be looking for new ways to reduce the amount of illegal dumping in our area.

    Last week, he signed an executive order that eliminates fees for city utility customers who bring trash to the transfer station in north Las Vegas. All residents have to do is show their utility bills to prove they’re customers.

  • Both the city of Las Vegas and San Miguel County are saving trees these days.

    Last year, the County Commission started using laptops at its meetings. Since then, I have been able to get a CD with all of the backup documentation for the issues on the county's agenda.

    That provides me with much information about county business and helps me report about it for our readers.

  • Thanks to everyone who made the 7th annual SynergyFest a success.  Thanks to the SynergyFest committee members for many months of hard work:  Rob Bailey, Mitch Barker, Rebecca Glenn, Lloyd Goding, Daniel Jencka, Ben Jeremiah and Cary Lane.  The volunteers from Amigos de Rio Gallinas School under the chair of Anny Ruge and Anna Ortega once again provided fun activities at the Sunshine Kids Village.  

  • A few years ago, Cinder Road was blacktopped with asphalt. The makeshift design by the county made little or no consideration for drainage or floodwater runoff. These problems were brought to the attention of county officials, with our concerns falling on deaf ears. After several heavy rains caused damage to my property and the county commissioner of District 1 did nothing to alleviate the problems caused by poor maintenance and design, I contacted Sen. Pete Campos.

  • The Arizona law is not liked by many because it clumps all Hispanics, Latinos and Mexicans into one group. It stereotypes them all as illegal, unemployed, drug dealers, and sponges of our system. I, like most of you, have not read the law itself, but only see what opponents and proponents say about it. But it doesn’t stereotype only one group, it does more.

  • On behalf of the Our Lady of Sorrows Church Confirmation Program, we would like to thank all the people who donated money, oranges and water for our annual Good Friday pilgrimage. We would also like to thank the Knights of Columbus and other volunteers for their assistance in traffic control and for providing water and oranges to our participants.

    In addition, we want to thank Richard Vigil for providing two buses and to the West Las Vegas School District for providing an additional two buses to transport the walkers from Las Vegas to Tecolote.