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Today's Opinions

  • Editorial Roundup: Newspaper opinions from around the nation - Oct. 25, 2013

    Gainesville (Fla.) Sun on cruel punishment (Oct. 20):
    It’s hard to have sympathy for someone executed for committing a horrific crime.
    In fact, some would say that murderers who make their victims suffer get off too easy when executed by lethal injection.
    Yet as long as our nation’s Constitution bans cruel and unusual punishment, and its people desire to be guided by their best and not their basest instincts, we need to question whether those values are consistent with our use of the death penalty.

  • Keep up the momentum

    We applaud the city of Las Vegas for its continued efforts to address the city’s long-standing water problems despite the recent rainstorms that have topped off city reservoirs.

    In past years, our collective concerns about water shortages would fade as soon as we’d get a little moisture. For all of its faults, the current city administration has done a good job of keeping the water problem front and center as it continues to chip away at the problem, bit by bit.

  • Editorial Cartoon - Oct. 23, 2013
  • Work of Art — Things we wouldn’t know . . .

    A columnist I admired in my early days in journalism was Hal Boyle, who wrote about 7,000 newspaper columns during a long career. He died in 1974 at the age of 64.

    Though he reported from the front lines during World War II, he didn’t limit his topics to war stories: Everything was fair game for the Associated Press writer, who often opened with, “Things a columnist wouldn’t know if he didn’t open his mail.”

  • Editorial Cartoons - Oct. 20, 2013
  • Editorial Cartoons - Oct. 20, 2013
  • Subpoena goes too far

    An attorney representing the state Department of Health is attempting to get her hands on a Santa Fe Reporter staff writer’s notes.

    Attorney Jennifer Hall served a subpoena on staff writer Joey Peters earlier this month. The subpoena demands that Peters turn over all notes documenting communications between Peters and Bob Ortiz, a former Department of Health employee who is now suing the state for alleged violations of the Whistleblower Protection Act. It also seeks all communications between the two individuals.

  • Another Perspective — Native amphibians in trouble

    By Eric Martin

    Las Vegas Optic

    The USGS Amphibian Research and Monitoring Initiative released a study this summer that states amphibian populations in the U.S. are declining at a rate of 3.7 percent  a year from the habitats they currently occupy. According to amphibianark.org, 165 is the “estimated number of amphibian species believed to have already gone extinct” and 500 is “the estimated number of amphibian species whose threats cannot be mitigated quickly enough to stave off extinction.”