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Today's Opinions

  • Let’s stand with Mora County

    Some native Americans decided what actions to take, or not take, by considering the effect of such action on the seventh generation down the line. They looked to the future and wanted what was best for their grandchildren’s grandchildren.

    They looked to future generations and did not just care about themselves.

    There is an old saying: The mark of a wise man is that he can look to the future and know what is most likely to occur. So, if fracking were to happen, what is most likely to occur?

  • Dulcey Amargo - Country lost its innocence

    It was beyond belief! It happened 50 years ago, Nov. 22, 1963, but in my mind, the images are as vivid as though it happened just yesterday.

    It was lunch hour at Sacred Heart Cathedral High School, a closed campus parochial school in Gallup, and the whole student body was assembled in the gym/cafeteria. As was our mode, all females sat at the south end tables, while the males sat across the gym floor at their stations. Our teachers, mostly Franciscan nuns and priests, circulated as we unpacked our lunch or brought our cafeteria trays to the tables where we socialized.

  • Where was Gary King?

    It took six months, but the Independent Petroleum Association of New Mexico — joined by three landowners — has carried through on its threat to sue Mora County.

    The lawsuit, filed last week in federal court in Albuquerque, contends that the community rights ordinance approved in April, which bans oil and gas operations in the county, is unconstitutional.

  • Editorial Cartoon - Nov. 20, 2013
  • Work of Art — A super-heated topic

    We were leaving a high school play that I had directed, “The Lottery,” by Shirley Jackson. It was exactly this time of year, and the weather conditions were identical to what’s happening tonight: chimneys blowing over, fences being uprooted, animals shivering.

  • Let’s solidify requirements

    Five years after state lawmakers passed legislation that mandates graduation standards for high school students, there’s still confusion about exactly what the new standards are.

    Indeed, superintendents from around the state worry that the changes could prevent thousands of students from graduating, according to The Associated Press. The concerns have prompted the state Public Education Department to delay enforcement of the new rules, allowing school district’s to come up with their own graduation requirements for the current school year.

  • Editorial Cartoon - Nov. 18, 2013
  • Another Perspective — Fund schools adequately

    By Felix Alderete

    For the Optic