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Editorials

  • Rooting for Campos

    It’s an unfortunate reality in Las Vegas politics that some people work hard to bring down their enemies — even at the expense of the larger community. We see and hear it mostly behind the scenes: People rooting for the failure of their adversary after they’ve been elected or selected to lead an institution that’s important to the city’s well being.

  • Fiestas!

    There’s no bigger event for Las Vegas than its July fiestas. And as far as we know, no public event has lasted quite so long.

    Fiestas de Las Vegas, which begins tonight with the reinas pageant, is now 120 years old. Back when it started, in 1888, Las Vegas was a bustling frontier town of sizable proportions, for those days, and New Mexico was still 24 years away from statehood.

  • A lightning rod for change

    In March, Las Vegas voters decided on a change in leadership at City Hall. It was a big change, from a majority that controlled City Hall to the minority opinion that things could be run better. But it pales in comparison to the sweeping changes that came Friday night, when Mayor Tony Marquez declared that there’s a new sheriff in town.

  • Thumbs - Our high-country lowdown on the news

    REASONABLE DISSENSION. Thumbs up. We agree with the majority regarding the Las Vegas City Council’s decision to impose Stage 1 water restrictions but we respect councilor Morris Madrid’s opposition to it at Wednesday’s meeting. Madrid called the decision “a little premature” and argued that the water conservation ordinance doesn’t require council action, since the city manager can take action on it independent of council direction.

  • The Taliban's comeback

    Here comes troubling news out of Afghanistan: Taliban militants are fighting to control several villages in the southern part of the nation so they can put themselves in a position to take back the city of Kandahar, their former spiritual home.

  • Fiestas need financial help

    With Fiestas de Las Vegas fast approaching, it’s worth mentioning that this will be the 120th year. But even with such notable longevity, it’s getting more and more difficult for the Las Vegas Fiesta Council to make ends meet. The community needs to step up more to support this invaluable cultural event.

  • Keep debate on the war

    Since World War II, most of our major party presidential candidates have served in the military. That changed when Bill Clinton won the presidency in 1992. He was able to avoid serving during the height of the Vietnam War by getting college deferments.

  • The flag represens freedom

    Last year, Democratic presidential candidate Barack Obama quit wearing his flag lapel pin on a regular basis. He said he thought the pin was a substitute for true patriotism.

    This may actually become an issue in this year’s presidential campaign — a distraction from the more important matters at hand, but an issue nonetheless.

    Never mind that both Republican presidential candidate John McCain and Obama’s former Democratic rival, Hillary Clinton, don’t wear such pins. Some on the far right are whispering that Obama doesn’t love his country.

  • Leger, Lucero for commission

    San Miguel County’s government is arguably the best-run in the area. That’s to the credit of the county manager, his staff and the current County Commission.

    With two competitive races for commission in Tuesday’s Democratic primary, it’s important voters look at which candidates are best able to continue the progress and find ways to improve those areas of county government that are lagging.

  • Forums offer opportunity

    This week, area voters will get a chance to see the candidates for county and legislative offices up close and personally. If you want to vote as an informed citizen, here’s an opportunity to get educated on the candidates and where they stand on the issues.