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Editorials

  • Our take on amendments

    On Nov. 2, voters will decide on five proposed state constitutional amendments. Here are our opinions on them:

  • Thumbs: Our high country lowdown on the news

    Thumbs down

  • Buying our votes, 2010

    The governor’s race is the most obvious case in point. Tune in to local radio or Albuquerque television for very long and you’re sure to get an ample dose of creative negativity and bold-faced hypocrisy. You can catch one of Susana Martinez’s ads hammering home Diane Denish’s misuse of taxpayer funds, or a Denish ad that rails against Martinez’s dark and sinister out-of-state connections.

  • Mora sheriff is double-dipping

    Mora County Sheriff Roy Cordova is another example of what’s so wrong with government. A few weeks ago, he took a job as a sheriff’s deputy in Valencia County.


    By his own undersheriff’s account, Cordova is now working only 16 to 24 hours a week as sheriff. But, of course, Cordova, whose Mora salary is more than $40,000 a year, is collecting his full paycheck.


    Cordova is probably not happy with the fact that he lost the Democratic primary in June. Could he now be taking it out on the taxpayers of Mora County?

  • Our take on the amendments

    Here are the Las Vegas Optic’s positions on the five state constitutional amendments that are coming before New Mexico voters in the general election:

  • Word play, lies and spin

    From time to time, the media have been criticized for avoiding the word “lie.” Instead, when a newsmaker is caught in a fabrication of the truth, journalists tend to prefer milder terminology, such as “mislead” or “stretch the truth.” We at the Optic are no exception; we don’t like to accuse someone of lying unless it is blatantly obvious that he or she intentionally did so.

  • Activism and 40 years

    Activism comes in many forms. Sometimes it comes from someone who is independently wealthy and wants to give something back. Other times, it’s from someone who started at or near the bottom and learned to fight for the rights of the disenfranchised. In Las Vegas last week we saw examples of both, when Robert Kennedy Jr., son of the late attorney general, senator and presidential candidate, visited alongside Arturo Rodriquez, president of the United Farm Workers of America.

  • Openness appreciated

    The state hospital informed its employees last month that it was taking a $5 million budget hit, urging everyone to conserve resources. Not long after, officials found out that $3 million of the lost budget authority was restored. This year’s budget is $58 million.

    Troy Jones, the hospital’s administrator, is optimistic that his organization will receive much of the remaining $2 million soon.

  • Targeting waste

    Recently, Mayor Tony Marquez challenged the city administration to reduce the number of take-home cars and cell phones by 10 to 20 percent. That’s an acceptable goal.

  • Lapse in judgment

    We’re sure San Miguel County Clerk Paul Maez ran the June primary elections in an above-board fashion. But because of a lapse in judgment on his part, some may now question whether that’s the case.

    According to campaign finance reports, Jerome Block Jr., a Democratic candidate for the state Public Regulation Commission, gave Maez $300 for a “campaign coordination,” with the county clerk’s office listed as Maez’s address. And the country band, Wyld Country, to which Maez belongs, got $2,500 for a gig at a Block rally.