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Opinion

  • It does seem to me that the road Las Vegas chose is far from the goals I remember the community was looking for.

    For starters, where did the pride for community go? My last visit was so disappointing that I left in a depressed state. As a child and young adult, I always felt intense pride in every aspect of the community.

  • I would like to thank all my sponsors who helped me be in this year’s Albuquerque Pageant.

    Without your help, I wouldn’t have been able to be this year’s third runner up. I appreciate everything you have done for me.

    Phylisia Dimas

    Las Vegas

  • One morning, about a week ago, a puppy ran in front of my car on the Eighth Street Extension and was killed. Had the puppy’s owner cared enough (or had common sense) to keep the puppy fenced in or tied up in its yard, not only would it be safe from traffic, wild pack dogs or other predators, but both the dog’s final suffering and my grief could have been avoided.

  • The Las Vegas Community Soup Kitchen operates completely on donations of food, money and time from volunteers in the community. For the first three years of operation, it served approximately 100-125 free meals per month. It started by being open once a week, on Thursday at noon in the basement of the First United Methodist Church. Since the price of gas started escalating a few months ago, the number has increased to between 600-650 free meals per month. An additional day was added in September when a free meal is also offered Tuesdays at 4 p.m.

  • We all enjoy the holidays, but with the holidays come parties and of tendencies to drink too much.

  • People are often unreasonable, illogical, and self centered. Forgive them anyway.

    If you are kind, people may accuse you of selfish, ulterior motives. Be kind anyway.

    If you are honest and frank, people may cheat you. Be honest anyway.

    What you spend years building, someone could destroy overnight. Build anyway.

    If you find serenity and happiness, they may be jealous. Be happy anyway.

    The good you do today, people will forget tomorrow. Do good anyway.

    Give the world your best you have and it may never be enough. Give your best anyway.

  • Growing up in post-World War II, small-town New Mexico left its mark on many of us.

    We watched our mothers and grandmothers saving everything, in advance of running out of or being caught unawares. It didn’t matter that we were on the cusp of the “throw-away” mentality going into the ‘50s — saving, recycling — doesn't matter how you want to euphemize it, it’s the way it was.

  • UP thum ...BIG MEN, SOFT HEARTS. The Los Hermanos Motorcycle Club distributed 513 toys for children in its annual and appreciated Toys for Tots drive. Hundreds of children stood in line at Sala de Madrid for the chance to see Santa Claus and receive some brand-new toys; one family, who had fallen victim to a theft in which their presents were taken — got some extra gifts to make their Christmas better.

  • SANTA FE — “Corruption is the most enduring tradition in New Mexico’s history.”

    Those are the words of my favorite historian, Dave Clary of Roswell reacting to last week’s column about New Mexico ranking low in a recent study to identify the most corrupt states in the nation.

    USA Today analyzed Department of Justice statistics for the past 10 years to find the states with the most convictions of public officials per 100,000 population.

  • (Editor’s note: This editorial first appeared on Christmas Day 2007.)

    We don’t think a secular, general circulation newspaper is the place to advance any one religious belief. It isn’t appropriate or even right to push our faith off on good people who believe differently. And, frankly, inclusiveness is consistent with our view that there are many paths to the Truth, and our search isn’t the only way to get there.

  • It’s been a full year since Gilberto Reyes has been in the San Miguel County jail. His trial for a charge of distribution of marijuana is set for late February.

    We suppose the players in our local justice system would argue that they are ensuring Reyes’ constitutional right to a speedy trial. We think such a claim is hogwash.

    As we have stated in this space before, we consider this case a huge failure of our justice system. And the blame goes around to all involved — the judge, the prosecutors and the defense attorney.

  • The Las Vegas City Museum’s Holiday Open was a success. About 40 attendees enjoyed the debut of “Jazzology,” a new singing group, holiday songs played by Ann Mishler, and tours of the collections. Donations for a number of raffle tickets were received by the Friends of the Museum, and money will go to the endowment fund.

  • “Are you the nice guy or the mean guy?” What? I hadn’t been asked that question in years. Hearing it, I harked w-a-y back, to 1966, when I still lived at my birthplace, at 906 Railroad, in a barrio we called “Tuff Street.”

    Every house got a little tuffer, and I lived in the last house. The person who inquired about my naughty- and nice-ness used to live in the second-to-the-last house.

  • In response to the column on the  options for Grand Street Improvements, we would like to offer the following comments. Our firm has had no involvement in this project except as residents and business owner in the area.

  • Last night at sundown, Hanukkah began. And while it may not be the dominant December holiday in New Mexico, it is still celebrated by many — and it serves to remind us that Jews have been an important part of who we are as New Mexicans.

  • SANTA FE — What kind of governor will Diane Denish be? There are some signs that our current lieutenant governor may do us a rather good job.

    Barring confirmation difficulties, it appears Gov. Bill Richardson will be leaving us sometime around the end of January to become the next secretary of the U.S. Commerce Department.

    There shouldn’t be many surprises for Denish. She has interned as lieutenant governor for six years. During the first four years, she and Richardson were close and she was involved in much of what he did.

  • I live in a solar-powered home on the quiet, rural mesa that Invenergy wants to turn into an industrial wind facility, and I don’t know if I should laugh or cry at this corporation’s claim that it is a “good neighbor” because it gives a whopping $500 per year to families living within a third of a mile of their turbines.

  • UP thumb ... WINDS OF INVOLVEMENT. Dozens of Bernal- and Valley-area residents attended the San Miguel County Commission meeting this week to express their concern with plans to build a wind farm near their homes. They want a county regulatory ordinance strengthened to push the turbines back further from residential properties.

    County Manager Lee Montoya recommended that county staff meet with residents and come up with a solution — a move we think is wise and we hope will benefit all involved.

  • "Why should we give up our beautiful landscape to make California, Nevada and Utah more resourceful?”

    That was the very first question at a recent community meeting in El Pueblo about a proposed “wind farm” on a nearby mesa.  It was from 13-year-old Ramos Aragon, a Memorial Middle School student, who’s family has agricultural ties to the Valley.

    Right on, Ramos!  He zeroed in on the heart of the issue.  

  • Once again, our city government is in turmoil. On Friday, City Manager Sharon Caballero announced her resignation.

    Undoubtedly, this is a low point for Mayor Tony Marquez, elected in March. Caballero said that while she supported the mayor’s agenda, he has been micromanaging and has had a hard time focusing. And Councilwoman Diane Moore, a Marquez ally, expressed her frustration with the mayor, echoing some of Caballero’s criticism.