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Opinion

  • This is in regards to your Nov. 20 editorial, “Marriage as a right” contending that Proposition 8 should be struck down (voted in by the people of California that only marriage between a man and a woman is valid) and again [an Associated Press] article on Dec. 1 emphasizing gay civil rights and equality.

  • Today marks the 60th anniversary of the Universal Declaration of Human Rights. This remarkable document, formulated in the aftermath of World War II, expanded the scope and application of our own Bill of Rights, written 159 years earlier.

     The UDHR applies to all individuals throughout the world, whatever their country or beliefs, without any exceptions for local customs. For example, “Marriage shall be entered into only with the free and full consent of the intending spouses.” (Article 16 (2))

  • Next week, San Miguel County Commission members will have a weighty issue placed on their shoulders. At 10 a.m. Tuesday, they will consider an amendment to the county’s renewable energy ordinance to establish greater setbacks and noise limits for wind turbines. We hope the commissioners will give it the serious consideration it deserves.

  • In high school, my biology teacher often showed films during class. I remember people would often point to the teacher in the darkened classroom as he dozed off. During lectures, he would often veer off course, talking about mice in the school or bees buzzing in the classroom.

    In short, we didn’t learn much.

  • On Nov. 11, Veterans Day, Espiridion Nick Aragon received recognition at the Veterans Park Services for his contributions and many years of service to the Veterans of Foreign Wars, Post 1547 of Las Vegas. It is with great pride that Nick and his family express their gratitude to VFW Post 1547, to Quarter Master Archie Garduño, and all comrades of the Veterans of Foreign Wars of Las Vegas and the surrounding area.

  • From time to time, New Mexico demonstrates that it is a forward-thinking state. From the Rail Runner between Albuquerque and Santa Fe to the planned Spaceport down south, our state has embraced the future. Whether you agree with these costly endeavors or not, it’s clear to all that they are designed with tomorrow in mind.

  • The Las Vegas City Council made the right decision last week when it rejected a proposal to include lobbying duties in the grant writer’s job description.

    Councilman Morris Madrid said the skills required of a lobbyist are far different from that of a grant writer. A grant writer for the city has to have considerable knowledge about the mechanics of government and the ability to research. A lobbyist, meanwhile, has to know how to work the political scene.

    Madrid made another good point: The mayor and council members themselves can serve as lobbyists.

  • Parents of students at Union Elementary take a special pride in their school. It’s small, and its students have been testing very well compared to others across the state.

    For some years now, the West Las Vegas district has been considering moving Union classes to Tony Serna Elementary and transferring the Family Partnership to Union.

    The school board should think long and hard before putting this plan into action. We’d hate to see a good thing end.

  • I am an off-grid, parttime resident of the Wrye Ranch area on the mesa south of Starvation Peak in San Miguel County and I am an advocate of alternative energy. However, I was recently  concerned about the plans described for the La Sierrita Wind Project in the “Residents Wary of the Mesa Wind Farm Deal” article in The New Mexican, dated Nov. 13, 2008.

  • Mil Gracias

    The Las Vegas Special Olympics would like to thank all the businesses that donated items for our fundraiser raffle sales. We would also like to thank everyone that brought raffle tickets. With the help of all the community and surrounding areas, our athletes will be able to participate in the next upcoming sport.

  • SANTA FE — To paraphrase an old love song, “Changing administrations is hard to do.” It’s especially true in tough times after a long romance of voters by both sides.

    We are getting smarter, however. When Franklin Roosevelt beat incumbent Herbert Hoover in 1932, he had to wait until March to take over. Now the date is Jan. 20.  New Mexico switches over on Jan. 1. That may be an even better idea.

  • Bottom line: Our elected representatives on the Las Vegas City Council should be kept in the loop when it comes to spending a more than $1 million grant.

    Sadly, that hasn’t been the case with a $1.2 million grant designated for a water project, and the city may lose all that money because of the resulting confusion.

  • I read with interest the lead story on Monday Nov 24 detailing deficiencies in our city parks and recreation center.  The sad condition of the parks was one of the first things we noticed upon our arrival in Las Vegas over 11 years ago, when our children were of an age to care about swings and slides. I hope the task force recommendations will have an impact.

  • “Change” is a key word during my administration as mayor of the beautiful city of Las Vegas. In early 2008, the citizens voted for that change, with new leadership and new direction. My administration continues to move forward in a proactive direction to effectively ensure the citizens of Las Vegas a quality city government. Today, we have implemented several initiatives to improve our city for the betterment of all Las Vegas residents.

  • UP thumb ... GOOD REPORTS. The citizen-based advisory panels that Las Vegas Mayor Tony Marquez has named in recent months are proving themselves valuable in highlighting problems facing our community on various fronts. Both the Parks and Recreation and the Plaza task forces have reported back to the Las Vegas City Council on the need to clean up and better maintain our parks and rec facilities and to improve the lines of communication between filmmakers and local businesses and residents affected by their activities.

  • It’s not unusual for Las Vegas parents to compare the East and West school districts, mostly from the vantage point of which one offers the best education for their children. But an Optic report published last week, took a different approach in looking at the two districts — by including a “by the numbers” comparison.

  • For experimental purposes only, I wanted to test the frequency of capital letters adorning products. Accordingly, I’ve arrayed a dozen items in front of me to test the theory.

    My belief is that most people overuse capital letters, LIKE THIS. And they like to play with exclamations marks as well!!!!!

    But it’s hard to hear anything or anybody when everyone’s shouting.

    Let me explain:

  • The list is long. Broken fences and bent basketball rims, overgrown  weeds and trash scattered about, a lack of working restroom facilities, graffiti — these are just a few of the items found to be at Las Vegas’ 14 public parks and recreation facilities. Scores of items were on the list. No wonder the mayor and city councilors described it as “embarrassing.”

  • The die is nearly cast and America’s newest presidential hope has chosen Hillary Clinton, the senator from New York and the spouse of an aberrantly brilliant American politician, for the important post of Secretary of State.  

    Bill Richardson, the affable, ingenious, out-of-the box guy, our ever-popular governor, ended up a distant second in the competition for this post. Those of us who like Bill and know of his uncanny capacity for insight and sound analysis — Wen Ho Lee excepted — are saddened and a bit querulous.

  • As an elementary teacher at Legion Park Elementary School, I am fortunate to work with some of the greatest people on this earth — the families of Las Vegas and their children. But even with such a great job, there are moments that stand out as spectacular events. The evening of Nov. 20, when we celebrated Harvest Night, was just such a moment.