.....Advertisement.....
.....Advertisement.....

Opinion

  • We wish public officials would more frequently ask the question, “What if this makes the newspaper?”

    It’s likely that Mora school officials didn’t ask this question when they went on a spending spree for legislators. Through a public records request, this newspaper discovered that the district spent thousands of dollars for perks for state legislators and Mora school officials.

  • The San Miguel County DWI Program would like to thank Pink Carnation Florist owner Patrick Padilla for their help with getting the message out to local students who attended prom.  The Pink Carnation Florist placed stickers on flower boxes for prom to remind them to stay sober and safe on prom night.

    Leonor Encinias

    DWI Prevention Specialist

  • Check out the news, read the papers, talk to friends and acquaintances; we are going through hard times.

    But is that anything new?  I wonder if scanning “The Book of Job” could give us some insight on the issue.

  • CONTINUING FORWARD MOMENTUM. The Highlands University Board of Regents and the Faculty Association reached an agreement last week that effectively ends a months-long dispute between the administration and educators. The new contract includes salary increases retroactive to the beginning of this academic year and changes in the school’s grievance, evaluation, promotion and tenure policies.

    A lot of improvements have been taking place at Highlands since President Jim Fries took over, so it’s good to see this issue resolved and the momentum continuing.

  • When I was taking journalism classes at the University of New Mexico, one of the most embarrassing lessons I learned was from a crusty old professor who used to be an editor at a daily paper.

    He had been retired from that job for years, but he still embodied what I thought was the typical image of an old school editor. He was slightly rotund, he always wore a starched white shirt with a few ink stains on it, and occasionally a bow tie. His voice was deep and gravelly, like he had spent a couple decades chomping on a cigar.

  • Over the last few months, San Miguel County has undertaken a diligent effort to revise its ordinance regulating wind farms. To its credit, the county drafted the ordinance six years ago, long before anyone seriously considered wind farms around here.

    Last year, when Chicago-based Invenergy presented its idea to have wind turbines in the Bernal area, some residents there expressed concern about noise pollution and the effects on scenery and wildlife. So the county formed a task force.

  • A few weeks ago, driving in Albuquerque, we noticed a couple — one steering, both pushing — who’d run out of gas close to a service station.

    With my wife driving, I did the Good Samaritan regimen, hopped out of the passenger’s side to help them get their Chevette up the ramp to the gas pumps on Montgomery.

  • As we enjoy graduation season, it’s important to recognize the contributions of teachers and principals. Good ones make a big difference.

    The Optic’s last Hometown Heroes feature profiled West Las Vegas’ choir director, Arnell David Arellanes, and West High School principal Gene Parson. Arellanes deserves credit for turning around the choir program a few years ago, and he has received solid support from Parson.

  • These days, Gov. Bill Richardson isn’t doing sitdown interviews with reporters from New Mexico. Since a pay-to-play controversy forced him to decline his nomination as Commerce secretary, Richardson has held just one such interview — with a reporter from the Washington Post.

  • As an education employee of the state of New Mexico, I have been asked to give up 1.5 percent of my pay for the coming fiscal year. A $400 million shortfall, they tell us. OK. The school district comes to us today, and asks us to give up one day’s pay to help balance the budget here in our district, and keep everybody employed. A $400,000 shortfall, they tell us. OK. We all know state revenue is down. A lot. I guess we all have to do our part, and we know things are much worse in other parts of the country.

  • This past weekend, a few hundred Highlands University and Luna Community College students walked across the commencement stage and received their degrees. And while some will go on to pursue another degree, most of them are about as academically prepared as they’re going to be for the working world.

    Unfortunately, they will enter the workforce during a recession, so it won’t be easy. Just about every job opening out there will have numerous applicants, so standing out in a crowd will be a challenge.

  • This past weekend, a few hundred Highlands University and Luna Community College students walked across the commencement stage and received their degrees. And while some will go on to pursue another degree, most of them are about as academically prepared as they’re going to be for the working world.

    Unfortunately, they will enter the workforce during a recession, so it won’t be easy. Just about every job opening out there will have numerous applicants, so standing out in a crowd will be a challenge.

  • For about four years now, Optic readers have been exposed to aggressive and fearless news reporting, and incisive, no-holds-barred editorials. Optic readers were not accustomed to a forceful press, and this has caused a not-so-quiet dialogue on the question of whether the Optic is too negative.

  • GRADUATING TO THE NEXT LEVEL. This weekend will be the Highlands University and Luna Community College graduations. Then, on May 22 and 23, East and West will hold commencements. Congratulations to all who will walk across the stage to receive their diplomas and degrees.

    It’s a time of transition for a lot of our young people — and their parents, who must let them go on to the next stage of life. The economic times may be tough, but there’s still a lot to look forward to, and our best wishes go out to all.

  • In your article written by David Giuliani, Miguel Angel is quoted as stating; “It doesn’t matter how many laws you make. If you don’t have a social solution to a social problem, you are only marginalizing the people in question.”

    We don’t have solutions for people who are incarcerated in prison and we know for a fact that prisons do not reform people, so should we do away with prisons and let everyone go until we decide what works? One can theorize and philosophize all day, but at whose expense?

    Ray Martinez

  •  

     I grew up in Mora, my family is from Buena Vista. The men on both sides of my familia were honored, almost obligated, to join the military, like my Uncle Moises Solano, Ernesto and Louie Garcia, my tio David Ulibarri Sr.., to include my niece Ethni Valdez from Las Aguitas whom just got extended again after six years as a Marine. All of these U.S. soldiers placed our lives for our little parts of Heaven here in Northern New Mexico.

  • When it comes to fighting crime, the sum of law enforcement agencies is often greater than the parts. That’s especially true in rural areas such as Mora County.

    As such, it’s troubling to find out that the Mora County sheriff and the state police aren’t getting along. Indeed, their leaders aren’t even talking.

    In Mora County, all 911 calls go to the state police. That makes sense because the Mora County Sheriff’s Department doesn’t operate around the clock. There are only five deputies, including the sheriff, and no detectives.

  • I am concerned with the Mora Independent Schools administration and school board’s decision to post all the jobs for the coaching positions. A coach’s job is one of the most important positions in a school district. They are teachers, counselors and mentors.

  • Earlier this year, the sexual allegations against Robertson High School Principal Richard Lopez and teacher and golf coach Jay Quintana made big headlines. Both were put on leave, and the matters were referred to the police. A woman alleged that Lopez harassed her a couple of times when she was trying to apply for a job. And Quintana was said to have sexually abused a golf team member for five years, starting when the alleged victim was 14.

    Let’s make one thing abundantly clear: Both of these men are presumed innocent until proven guilty.

  • We appreciate the way in which Highlands University officials are proceeding with plans to build a new student center — by hosting a well-attended community meeting for public input and promising to seek student input as well. A student center isn’t just another construction project for the school, it’s a big deal for a lot of people, so it’s only right to involve as many people as you can along the way.