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Opinion

  • During Mora County’s public hearing on oil and gas drilling, everyone agreed on one thing: Mora County is one of the most beautiful places in the world. And, indeed, the view is incredible.

    Many of the speakers at the hearing said they didn’t want anything that would spoil the scenery, and in their minds, oil and gas drilling would do just that. They also contended that the drilling would cause water and air pollution.

    To help their arguments, some ranchers came in from San Juan County to talk about the negative impacts of natural gas drilling there.

  • The inaugural Inside Adobe Walls festival took place June 27-28 at the Inn on the Santa Fe Trail, and was a big success.

  • The city’s Charter Commission, charged with reviewing the city’s most important document, is busy these days, preparing to hold public meetings in all parts of town and make recommendations to the Las Vegas City Council in early September.

    We’re looking forward to the input citizens will have on what should and shouldn’t be changed in the city charter, and thought we’d get our two cents in early:

  • This letter is in reference to the unfair and brutal stabbing death of a young male individual that left an 8-year old without the loving, caring presence of his father.

  • The disheartening story about lifelong Las Vegas resident Gordy Thatcher and her struggle to maintain and keep her home on Tilden Street is a tale of systematic failure — on the part of social services, the city and private individuals with the best of intentions.

  • The Public Education Department recently held a public hearing on a rule change that would allow students to choose to opt out of the daily recitation of the Pledge of Allegiance. The opportunity for written public comment will continue through 5 p.m. on July 27, so it’s not too late to express your opinion.

  • Can you imagine having a job that wherever you go, someone is unhappy that you’re there?

    That would largely define the job of a police. officer. You stop someone for speeding, that person is mad. “Why don’t you go after the real criminals?” the speeder asks.

    Truth be told, officers often catch the bad guys at seemingly routine traffic stops.

    When an officer responds to a domestic violence call, you can be sure someone is upset about his arrival. And trying to bring peace is like bringing the Israelis and Palestinians together.

  • I recently retired as the WLVMS principal after 32 years in education.   Throughout my career, I have found that it takes a community to raise a child.  I would like to thank the many individuals and businesses in Las Vegas for helping me make a difference as a teacher and as an administrator.

  • The Optic gave it a thumbs down (but) I like using the intersection of Grand and University. No, I am not kidding. For years we had traffic lights and it was the worst intersection in town. I had many near misses there because someone was running the light or simply wasn’t paying attention. Since it’s become a four-way stop, I like using it because it is an experience in human interaction. Everybody is on guard. Everybody pays attention to their surroundings and their place in line. I have yet to see someone being rude or pushy.

  • Every summer the noise from Harleys and loud cars gets worse. It’s too noisy here! It’s noise pollution gone wacko!

    Warm weather used to be birdies singing and flowers blooming. Now it’s an unrelenting onslaught of nerve-wracking explosive noise. I’ve come to dread the nice weather because I know what’s coming.

  • I would like all those people who use the e-mail for their trash communication to know I am sending my Quarantine Summaries to the Albuquerque FBI office. The Bureau investigates each e-mail sender on that list. So those of you who think their jokes and trash communication are funny, you can expect a knock on your door from an FBI agent.

  • thumb UP for ... THE FIESTAS. Maybe the rain didn’t always cooperate, and perhaps there were controversial moments, but it was still another fun and successful Fiestas de Las Vegas, with plenty of good music and dance and fun for young and old alike.

    Congratulations, Fiesta Council, on another job well done.

  • In a recent letter to the editor, Kathleen Dudley from Ocate cited Farmington as an area devastated by the oil and gas industry. She speculates that Farmington was “most likely” a farming area which is now “vastly industrialized with... (no) sound of roosters crowing, or sight of a herd of sheep, or acequias open, flooding fields of alfalfa.”

    I am puzzled and can only conclude that we see what we want to see. The last time I was in Farmington, I saw all the above (though I didn’t hear a rooster crow).

  • I picked up your July 6-7 issue of the Optic and was upset by the use of the word “jihad” in (David Giuliani’s column) “It’s hard to say no to a boss.”

    In recent years the media has used the term jihad to push anti-Islamic sentiment. When used in the context printed in the article, it undermines the progress being made by Muslims, to mend the differences of between the various faiths.

  • The SynergyFest committee wishes to thank the many businesses, organizations and individuals who helped to make this year’s fest a success. The fest drew over 500 attendees who talked with our exhibitors, attended workshops, and listened to music. The Sunshine Kids Village, sponsored by Amigos de Rio Gallinas School offered children’s games, crafts and other activities.

  • Las Vegas City Schools Superintendent Rick Romero faces a misdemeanor charge of failure to report child abuse or neglect to law enforcement authorities, as do Athletic Director Mike Yara, former football coach Ray Woods and two former assistant coaches.

    The district attorney’s office alleges that these men failed to notify authorities about allegations that football players sodomized their teammates with broomsticks during a football camp last year.

  • In another matter pending before the district, we don’t think high school teacher and coach Jay Quintana should be allowed back into the classroom — not as long as there are legal questions pending about his behavior with students. So far, no criminal charges have been filed against Quintana, but an outstanding tort claim alleges that he had sex, repeatedly and over several years, with a student.

    As long as such a serious issue remains unresolved, parents would be understandably outraged if he were allowed back into the classroom with their children.

  • During the Punic Wars, my high school girlfriend and I went steady by telephone. A house full of teenagers placed demands on our phone, so my slot had to be early in the evening, lest I interfere with my three sisters’ more important calls.

    One time, after having been on the line for an ungodly amount of time — six minutes — I mentioned something in Mad Magazine.

  • At the behest of a small group of concerned citizens (including the publisher of this newspaper), a Highlands University class took on a divisive local issue, conducted a survey, and produced evidence that, well, maybe the issue isn’t as divisive as one might think.

    In doing so, the professor and her class may just have given Las Vegas what it needs to honestly confront the issue.

  • It has been nearly six months since Jan. 15, since our son Mikey has been gone. His dreams were shattered when his young life came to an abrupt end and our hearts were broken, but today we remember how strong our faith in God is and in his promises to us, and we know that Michael is in Heaven and that he is watching over all of us, his friends and relatives, and his fellow residents of Las Vegas, for he was a “Vegas boy.”