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Opinion

  • Bill Richardson has been New Mexico’s governor since 2003, and he has done some good things since taking the helm.

    His all-out effort against drunken driving has seen some success. And unlike his predecessors, Richardson has made economic development a priority, and that includes the film industry, which has benefitted Las Vegas.

  • An open letter to Congressman Joe Wilson (and those who support his outburst):

    Presidents and their administrations come and go. This country was founded on principles and institutions — and not on individuals. The fastest way to erode the very foundations of this country is to legitimize the disrespect and contempt of these very foundations.

  • I would like to add to Glenn Yocum’s letter to the Optic published Sept. 11. Glenn’s letter indicated that he had received superior service from Medicare personnel than he did from any private insurer he contacted.  

    While I would echo his comments from my own experience, I would add something Glenn may not know. Medicare provides superior service at a much lower cost. The Medicare program spends 97 cents of every tax dollar they receive paying benefits and only 3 cents on administration.

  • The friends of Carnegie Library would like to extend an enormous thank you to the citizens and businesses of the city of Las Vegas for their overwhelming support of our annual raffle fundraiser. This year, we have five art pieces, donated by local artists that will each make a beautiful addition to the homes of our winners.

  • The claims by the Las Vegas mayor and city attorney that they did not have to turn over e-mails between the mayor and city councilors because they were communicated over a private account or a private nongovernment server is like saying that it’s not public record if the mayor and city councilors had a conference call over the mayor’s home phone or held a meeting at the mayor’s house.

      Nothing like “common sense” can effect the thinking of the political mind when scrambling for an excuse.

  • thumb DOWN for ... WAY TOO MANY. It’s hard to keep up with the violence. The latest is the death of 59-year-old Ernest Gutierrez, who police say was killed by the hands of his son-in-law, Mica Murray. He was allegedly choked to death.

    By our count, that makes three homicides this year alone. According to FBI statistics, the national homicide rate is one per 20,000 people; here in San Miguel County, the rate this year alone is one in 10,000. And there have been at least 10 homicides in Las Vegas since May 2007.

  • This could be titled, “What happens when the Attorney General explains the law to our interim city attorney.”

    I am embarrassed, as a citizen of the city of Las Vegas to have a mayor that condones this behavior.  When the city attorney states there are no emails on the city server, but when the information comes to the light of day, guess who is copied — the city attorney. And this is the man who wants to teach ethics to our governing body?

  • I have health insurance and get health care from Medicare. I am one of the 85 percent of the American population that has health insurance and am extremely unsatisfied with having the insurance company attempting to decide what is best medically for me. My wife’s insurance cost about $55 a month; mine cost nearly $1,000 per month. I cannot receive any health insurance under another carrier because of my existing medical disabilities. We need health-care reform that does, at minimum, the following:

  • Forty-five years ago this month, a bipartisan group of lawmakers agreed to legislation that would have a lasting impact on our nation’s public lands — not by changing them, but by making sure some portion of these magnificent wild places would stay as they were for all time and for all generations to use and enjoy. The Wilderness Act, signed into law Sept. 3, 1964, was acknowledgement that our public lands are part of what shape us as a people and that there is value in protecting some of them in their pristine state as a natural legacy.

  • “I  demand an immediate apology!” “Awwright, I apologize.” “Well that’s more like it.”

    Have there ever been any more meaningless words than those surrounding a call for an immediate apology? Not likely.

  • We don’t often second-guess the judicial system — cases cannot and should not be decided in the press. But this one begs the question.

  • I have some property between Montezuma and Los Vegiles; it was past to me by my parents. The only access to my property is the ridge. The bridge is in need of repairs. It has holes and the lumber is rotting. It’s been like that for seven years. That bridge was constructed by Storrie Lake project. I contacted Robert Quintana and was told he would bring it up in the monthly meeting and he would let me know the outcome.

  • We like to see a certain level of competition in education, and that’s a big reason why we support charter schools. Such schools can reach those students who struggle in conventional settings, and push traditional schools to do better as well.

    As such, we were happy that Luna Community College showed some innovation by proposing the creation of an on-campus charter school. But last week, the state Public Education Commission said no to the idea.

  • The Las Vegas Landlord Association would like to extend a heartfelt “thank you” to Mayor Tony Marquez, the City Council, and the Las Vegas city administration and support staff for their efforts and assistance in amending the city ordinance that now releases landlords form incurring tenant unpaid utility bills — as provided for and affirmed by New Mexico state law.

  • On August 14, we were serving our lunch crowd at Mary Ann’s Restaurant when one of our customers went into an epileptic seizure and fell to the floor. Michael Sedillo and his mother were having lunch when this occurred. Mr. Sedillo immediately rendured first responder aid. He kept our customer from choking or hurting himself during the seizure. Mr. Sedillo cared for our customer until the seizure had passed and he came around.

    The ambulance arrived 15 minutes after being called and examined the customer.

  • Eight years ago, the Las Vegas City Council passed a water conservation ordinance. As many residents know, part of that law calls for stages of conservation as water shortages worsen.

    Now the city is looking to revise it.

    But in so doing, local officials should be realistic. If they can’t follow through on the provisions of the ordinance, then those requirements shouldn’t be included in the first place.

  • In light of City Hall antics, it’s sometimes tempting to curtail the powers of the mayor and City Council.

    The Charter Commission, a panel appointed by the governing body, has made no bones about drafting a new city charter that seeks to keep the council and mayor under control. The panel is working to replace the 40-year-old city charter.

  • The Las Vegas Robertson High School FFA students who are competing at the National FFA Convention in Indianapolis would like to thank the Mora/San Miguel County Fair Association, and all of the many wonderful FFA supporters that attended that event and either bought raffle tickets from our students or bid on merchandise at our silent auction. As a result of your support, we were able to raise a substantial amount that will help us to travel to Indianapolis and represent Mora and San Miguel Counties, as well as Las Vegas Robertson and the State of New Mexico.

  • thumb DOWN for ... HAVE WE LEARNED ANYTHING? On this day eight years ago, the world changed. That single day pushed this nation into a war against terrorism, and for a brief moment in time, we were united. No more — now it seems Americans are even more polarized than we were before the attacks. And that’s a crying shame.

    Still, on this day we need to remember those who died on Sept. 11, 2001, and pray that their tragic passing is not in vain.

  • We wish to call your attention to a situation at Sapello School, which we feel needs urgent correction. We are members of the school’s Parent Advisory Board, and/or concerned parents and residents in the Sapello area.