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Opinion

  • This could be titled, “What happens when the Attorney General explains the law to our interim city attorney.”

    I am embarrassed, as a citizen of the city of Las Vegas to have a mayor that condones this behavior.  When the city attorney states there are no emails on the city server, but when the information comes to the light of day, guess who is copied — the city attorney. And this is the man who wants to teach ethics to our governing body?

  • I have health insurance and get health care from Medicare. I am one of the 85 percent of the American population that has health insurance and am extremely unsatisfied with having the insurance company attempting to decide what is best medically for me. My wife’s insurance cost about $55 a month; mine cost nearly $1,000 per month. I cannot receive any health insurance under another carrier because of my existing medical disabilities. We need health-care reform that does, at minimum, the following:

  • Forty-five years ago this month, a bipartisan group of lawmakers agreed to legislation that would have a lasting impact on our nation’s public lands — not by changing them, but by making sure some portion of these magnificent wild places would stay as they were for all time and for all generations to use and enjoy. The Wilderness Act, signed into law Sept. 3, 1964, was acknowledgement that our public lands are part of what shape us as a people and that there is value in protecting some of them in their pristine state as a natural legacy.

  • “I  demand an immediate apology!” “Awwright, I apologize.” “Well that’s more like it.”

    Have there ever been any more meaningless words than those surrounding a call for an immediate apology? Not likely.

  • We don’t often second-guess the judicial system — cases cannot and should not be decided in the press. But this one begs the question.

  • I have some property between Montezuma and Los Vegiles; it was past to me by my parents. The only access to my property is the ridge. The bridge is in need of repairs. It has holes and the lumber is rotting. It’s been like that for seven years. That bridge was constructed by Storrie Lake project. I contacted Robert Quintana and was told he would bring it up in the monthly meeting and he would let me know the outcome.

  • We like to see a certain level of competition in education, and that’s a big reason why we support charter schools. Such schools can reach those students who struggle in conventional settings, and push traditional schools to do better as well.

    As such, we were happy that Luna Community College showed some innovation by proposing the creation of an on-campus charter school. But last week, the state Public Education Commission said no to the idea.

  • The Las Vegas Landlord Association would like to extend a heartfelt “thank you” to Mayor Tony Marquez, the City Council, and the Las Vegas city administration and support staff for their efforts and assistance in amending the city ordinance that now releases landlords form incurring tenant unpaid utility bills — as provided for and affirmed by New Mexico state law.

  • On August 14, we were serving our lunch crowd at Mary Ann’s Restaurant when one of our customers went into an epileptic seizure and fell to the floor. Michael Sedillo and his mother were having lunch when this occurred. Mr. Sedillo immediately rendured first responder aid. He kept our customer from choking or hurting himself during the seizure. Mr. Sedillo cared for our customer until the seizure had passed and he came around.

    The ambulance arrived 15 minutes after being called and examined the customer.

  • Eight years ago, the Las Vegas City Council passed a water conservation ordinance. As many residents know, part of that law calls for stages of conservation as water shortages worsen.

    Now the city is looking to revise it.

    But in so doing, local officials should be realistic. If they can’t follow through on the provisions of the ordinance, then those requirements shouldn’t be included in the first place.

  • In light of City Hall antics, it’s sometimes tempting to curtail the powers of the mayor and City Council.

    The Charter Commission, a panel appointed by the governing body, has made no bones about drafting a new city charter that seeks to keep the council and mayor under control. The panel is working to replace the 40-year-old city charter.

  • The Las Vegas Robertson High School FFA students who are competing at the National FFA Convention in Indianapolis would like to thank the Mora/San Miguel County Fair Association, and all of the many wonderful FFA supporters that attended that event and either bought raffle tickets from our students or bid on merchandise at our silent auction. As a result of your support, we were able to raise a substantial amount that will help us to travel to Indianapolis and represent Mora and San Miguel Counties, as well as Las Vegas Robertson and the State of New Mexico.

  • thumb DOWN for ... HAVE WE LEARNED ANYTHING? On this day eight years ago, the world changed. That single day pushed this nation into a war against terrorism, and for a brief moment in time, we were united. No more — now it seems Americans are even more polarized than we were before the attacks. And that’s a crying shame.

    Still, on this day we need to remember those who died on Sept. 11, 2001, and pray that their tragic passing is not in vain.

  • We wish to call your attention to a situation at Sapello School, which we feel needs urgent correction. We are members of the school’s Parent Advisory Board, and/or concerned parents and residents in the Sapello area.

  • In Dale Harapat’s letter, published Sept. 7, there were two typographical errors in the closing sentence. It should have read “Such corrective actions would show female children, like my two daughters, and all citizens, that the most qualified and experienced person is really the best person for the job, no matter what sex they are, especially one as significant and important as chief judge.”

  • I have a large dog. Over the years I have feared he may someday bite someone other than the “bad guy,” so I have been exceptionally careful to protect him and others from something going “terribly wrong.”

    I have recently learned, however, that nothing would happen to my dog or myself if he were to viciously attack an innocent passerby walking his or her dog. No, my 87-pound Chow mix could silently charge and attack a naïve citizen and his or her dog and I would have no worries.

  • The U.S. Congress is considering a proposal to create a new mega-regulator designed to address abusive financial practices. Not only would this approach undermine small community banks and cause more harm than good, but it also misses the best opportunity to protect consumers: namely, addressing the too-big-to-fail concentration risks among our nation’s biggest banks that have cost Americans over $7 trillion in economic worth.

  • On Sept. 1, I made a transition from health insurance provided by my former employer to Medicare and a Medicare supplement. Perhaps my story has some relevance to the larger health care debate raging the past few months. Certainly it seemed so to me.

  • At 6 p.m. today, President Obama is going to speak to Congress about health care reform. It’s a big speech in that he needs to convince not only Congress but the American public that we’re better off passing some real health care reforms now rather than putting it off, again, until who knows when.

  • The Optic has maintained for six months that state law requires the city of Las Vegas to release e-mails involving a quorum of the City Council.

    Our argument was pretty simple: The state Open Meetings Act mandates that governing bodies discuss public business in the open. And that law includes all forms of communication, including e-mail.

    But City Attorney Carlos Quiñones stood in the way of openness, as is too often the case at City Hall. He told the Optic that the city couldn’t find any e-mails on its server involving a quorum of the council.