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Opinion

  • It’s called “The Big Lie.” Hitler coined the term. Hitler believed that we, the people, actually are more vulnerable to colossal, outrageous lies than we are to small and relatively trivial falsehoods. He reasoned that the vast majority of us tend to tell the small and niggling little lies of the “that dress looks great on you” variety on a regular basis. Consequently,  petty falsehoods are within our experience and we are on the lookout for them.

  • As stated in this space last Monday, the Optic is in the business of conversations. And in that regard, we’re proud to have played a role in facilitating an open discussion last Tuesday regarding the possible consolidation of Las Vegas’ two school districts. Opinions were fairly evenly mixed between those who favor, those who oppose and those who simply had questions — and the varying viewpoints produced a healthy and vibrant discussion.

  • The second annual chile contest at this year’s Mora-San Miguel County Fair was a successful event. Over 200 people came out to participate in the judging in the different types of homemade chile. The contestants cooked both red and green chile. This year’s first place award went to Amy Chavez, second place Lydia Benavidez, and third place winner Juan Ortiz. The people’s choice award went to Manuel Benavidez.

  • In the spring of 2006, a woman told me at a local restaurant about a West Las Vegas schools-sponsored party that cost thousands of dollars. It was invitation only. No kids allowed.

    The kicker: It was paid for with taxpayer funds, she said.

    That sounded interesting, but unbelievable. I had a lot of stories on my plate at the time, so I didn’t put any time into pursuing this lead.

    But one by one, five more people called me up to tell me about the party.

  • As a citizen of the United States of America and as a God (Judeo/Christian God) fearing person, I was surprised and outraged to read an article on ABC News Jake Trapper and Karen Travers report dated Aug. 19, that in a conference call with liberal and progressive religious leaders President Obama railed against those who were “bearing false witness” in the debate over health care reform.

  • The recent article “Get both sides out there” characterized the Rainbow Club gay float as irrelevant and nonsense. The author opined that the Optic’s reporting of the event was “tragic” on the basis of certain Biblical passages that allegedly brand all homosexuality an “abomination.” He equated homosexuality to rape, incest, bestiality, and necrophilia. He challenged a public debate on homosexuality — the specific area was left open-ended.

  • To councilor Diane Moore: Thank you for looking out for the interests of Las Vegas’ taxpayers.

    We are too easy. Taxpayers get hit by federal, state, county, city, etc., for the little money available in Las Vegas and its surroundings, and no one seems to care.

    I was glad to see you stand up for the taxpayer in denying yet another big hire. Perhaps the customer service manager hire can be rescinded, also. As you are aware, I argue that our elected council persons are our customer service manager, that is the reason they are elected.

  • Thumbs up

    OPEN DISCUSSION. We’ve called it “the ‘c’ word” in the past because of the overall reluctance people have with discussing it, but now “consolidation” appears to be out of the bag. Some 150 Las Vegas and area citizens came out Tuesday night to openly talk about the pros and cons to unification of the school districts. The result was an agreement that a fact-finding committee should be formed to explore the issue more deeply.

  • I have always been proud of my hometown. When I read that a recent parade included a float that supported the gay community it confirmed what I already knew, that Las Vegas was a small town with a genuine warm friendly feeling that was accepting of all good people.  

  • If Mayor Tony Marquez kept his promise on open government, he would make his life a lot easier. And he’d do the public a big favor.

    Here we go again: The mayor gets in his bunker, broods in secret and comes up with schemes to get back at his perceived enemies. Then he ends up embarrassing his administration. And then when the bad news gets out, he lashes out yet again. And around and around we go.

  • Words are meaningless. Well, some words. Let me explain: There actually were good old days when a handshake sealed a deal, when people who promised to pay actually came through, when people didn’t need to get into the “did not/did too” entanglement.

    Nowadays, too many words tend to be laden with sarcasm. The last time you heard someone say, “excuuuze me,” “sorrry” or “You’re so-oo much help” you probably weren’t seduced by notions of sincerity.

  • Las Vegas City Attorney Carlos Quiñones often prefers government secrecy.  

    He would be doing the public he serves a great favor if he were to make openness the rule, not the exception.

    Unfortunately, he falls into the trap that many attorneys do — only reveal what you absolutely need to, and nothing more.

    A few months ago, we found out that a City Council quorum was discussing city business outside of public meetings via e-mail, a practice denounced by the New Mexico Foundation for Open Government.

  • I am writing to express my thanks to the DAs Office and the New Mexico State Police for their recent work in identifying and arresting several of the individuals responsible for break-ins and burglaries over the past year in our neighborhood in Mineral Hill. Your continued attention and presence is appreciated.

    Chris Nelson

    Mineral Hill

     

  • On August 9, the Ride To Pride 4-H and Junior Rodeo Club hosted the finals for its 2009 Junior Rodeo Playday Series. The summer event consisted of a series of three Playdays with awards through fifth place going out to Boosters, Novice, Juniors, Seniors and an Open Division. A great family event, competitors from all over New Mexico ranging in ages 5 to 46 competed in speed and roping events.

  • This newspaper is in the business of conversations. We initiate them. We participate in them. We encourage them. We believe that the more our community is engaged in healthy conversation and debate, the more likely we are to find solutions to the challenges we face.

  • The past several months have been difficult for those of us who live in the Mineral Hill area. We have endured multiple burglaries  that keep us on the edge of our seat.  I must say that the district attorney’s office and the state police have provided us with investigative resources that continue to help us pursue these individuals. I applaud their efforts and want to encourage them to continue to apply resources so we can resolve these crimes.  

  • Thumbs up

    WISE DECISION. We want to give a BIG thumbs up to the East school district, for doing what had to be done. Superintendent Rick Romero announced this week that Robertson High School teacher Jay Quintana has been fired. Six months ago, the math teacher and golf coach was placed on paid leave stemming from allegations that he had sex on multiple occasions with a student.

  • Like many women (and often, these days, men), I carry a shoulder bag almost everywhere I go. Back in the ‘60s it was a handbag, but through the years it has gained in volume and capacity. In an earlier column, I referred to the convenience or perhaps vanity of “being prepared” for any eventuality with the contents of my purse. There’s been a slight change of perspective recently.

  • I am the sister of Richard Osgood, who my husband wrote to you about earlier.  I am so upset over missing my brother that I don’t know what to do. I am grateful to my husband for contacting you because I never would have thought of that. We have had to come up with some creative ideas, since we have had little luck getting the police to react to our situation. Pray that a loved one of yours is never a “missing person.”

  • Rep. Ben Ray Lujan’s public meeting this week in Santa Fe didn’t turn out like the other town hall meetings we’ve been hearing about across the country. Absent were the loud protests by those opposed to the Obama administration’s health-care plan. One reason, more than likely, is that organizers of the event took written questions instead of letting citizens shout out their questions and concerns from the floor. Smart move, since those who are so aggressively against President Obama’s plan have become a bullying, not-so-silent minority.