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Features

  • Two years ago, I was a high school sophomore with no cell phone. Almost everyone I knew had one, but I wasn’t terribly jealous. I lived in a small town and went to a small school. It wasn’t difficult to get a hold of me, and I didn’t think I really needed a cell phone.

  • Four people float in a rain-reminiscent sky, simple grins lighting round faces, arms extended past swollen bodies the colors of spring grass.

    They fly in harmony, in silly joyous formation, a family of Macy’s Parade balloons, perhaps, or a collection of free-wheeling cartoon thought bubbles. Rick Mobbs’ study in watercolors, “Flying,” offers a glimpse into captured serenity, but the artist’s vocation began in a place far from calm.

  • Some days the relentless negative news blaring from the television or computer screen taunts the viewer: the country’s gone crazy! Lunatics are running the world. Days like that, what’s a sane person to do?

  • Joshua Sandoval grins, microphone in small hand. The tiny Los Ninos Elementary School student struts around the stage as if owns it, as if he carries no fear.

    He sings a traditional Latino song with confidence, with an inner peace so fierce, so radiantly happy, his audience can’t help but smile with him. Sandoval, along with other members of the Las Vegas community, will be on the bill for Casa de Cultura’s first Noche de la Trova talent night, Thursday, Feb. 21, at Joe’s Ringside Bar on Grand Avenue.

  • New Mexico Highlands University student Juan Archuleta will be giving a presentation, Thursday, Feb. 21 at the Las Vegas Citizen's Committee for Historic Preservation, about folk music of New Mexico. The talk presents a historical and ancestral interpretation of New Mexico folk music, including rancheras, corridos, romances, and Inditas. Many of these songs originated in Spain and traveled to the New World with the Spanish.

  • A skeleton struts, his feathered hat jauntily tipped over eye socket, along a gallery wall at NMHU’s Burris Hall. He stands before three simple stone-marked graves, one littered with rose petals and a bodiless bony wrist.

  • A large part of my life has been spent at my dad’s office, next to Allsup’s and Pete’s Fitness. According to my mom, we practically lived there. I had my own little desk (which was actually just a small filing cabinet), and a blanket and pillow that I would use when I passed out on the floor.

  • Sonya Berg plans to focus her attention on Las Vegas’ winged creatures this Feb. 15-18, as an active participant in the 11th Annual Great Backyard Bird Count. A member of the Friends of Las Vegas National Wildlife Refuge, Berg realizes how important citizen science can be.

  • Margarito Mondragn pressed gravel into upturned ground, spread asphalt, worked the bulldozers, scrapers, tampers that molded New Mexico’s roads until he shifted gears 13 years ago, retiring from the State Highway Department to become an artist like his grandfather and great-grandfather, both well-known santeros.

  • Two weeks ago, a friend and I drove to Santa Fe to see “Cloverfield.” The movie is about a monster that attacks New York City, killing many unsuspecting victims, including every important character in the movie. If you haven’t seen the movie yet, don’t be angry with me. Just believe me when I say I haven’t ruined it for you.

  • The Din emerged from three previous underworlds into this, the “Glittering World,” through a magic reed. The first beings from the other worlds were not like the people of today - they were animals, insects, the masked spirits seen in Navajo ceremonies, the mix of predator and prey, heaven and solid ground that forms reality. Melanie Yazzie captures the stories of her people through her own magic reed, the tools of an artist.

  • Come and see the splendor and magic of Belle dreaming about something more. Be a part of the drama when Aladdin discovers the genie in the lamp. Listen as the Little Mermaid laments over love.

  • I was on my way to class when I saw Leigh, Jazzmine, and Ashley leaving the building where our next class was. “Don’t go in there,” they said, very seriously. “Why not?” I asked, though I wasn’t complaining. “We’re going to get donuts.” With that, I felt an intense amount of happiness well up inside me. School is important, but it’s things like this we will always remember.

  • The New Mexico Hispano Music Association recently hosted their 17th Annual Awards Show at the Ohkay Casino Event Center. The event took place Jan. 19, in Espaola and featured performances by several New Mexico artists including, El Gringo, 45, Candace Vargas, Steve Chavez, Jenna, Mathew Martinez, The Blue Ventures, Al Hurricane Jr., our very own Mariachi Paisano del Valle and Gonzalo.

  • The student technical crews managing Ilfeld Auditorium at NMHU know what it’s like to work under pressure. Studying theater arts trains students in the areas of communication and human relations skills, and gives them experience as members of a team working toward a common goal.

    Donna Martinez, manager of both Ilfeld and the KEDP student radio station, understands how to motivate her work study students, how to push them in ways that expand their abilities.

  • Last weekend, I did something I’ve never done before. I watched the Miss America pageant in its entirety.

    A friend of mine hosted a party for the occasion, complete with flashcards on each contestant. Upon arrival, guests were given piles with about six flashcards. The guest whose pile contained the flashcard of the winning contestant was given a plastic tiara at the end of the night.

  • The Salvation Army Thrift Store holds secret treasures —cobalt blue depression-era glass, old 45’s engraved with Elvis’ finest, faded leather couches, and enough chipped knick-knacks to line every mantel in town.

  • Beyond the seemingly childlike forms and curiosity in Melanie Yazzie’s artwork lies a confident statement.

    Yazzie, a Navajo/Dine of the Salt Water Clan and Bitter Water Clan of the Dine, blends imagery from native cultures around the globe into a palate of relaxed color.

  • “I like to think of my customers first,” is a statement that often comes out of business owner’s mouths, yet few actually practice it. Raising prices, competition, and a high employee turnover are common in the restaurant world. What happened to focusing on the food?

  • I never imagined that this was what it would be like to be a senior. I spent all of my high school years waiting for this to come.

    When I was a freshman, I looked up to the seniors as if they were so old, but now I look at myself and I’m not that old at all. When I had to go to school to take some standardized test while the seniors stayed at home sleeping, I couldn’t wait till that would be me. And now it is. Next week, while sophomores are taking the Competency Exam, I’ll be sleeping in. Ha!