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Features

  • Music has always been a large part of my life.

    Since I was little my dad used to make me watch the movie Amadeus with him, so I could learn about Mozart and classical music. We watched musicals together, such as My Fair Lady, Grease, Jesus Christ Superstar, and The Sound of Music, which are still all some of my favorites.

  • The New Mexico Highlands Concert Choir will perform works by one of America’s most distinguished Broadway composers and lyricists for its spring program April 20 at 3 p.m. in Ilfeld Auditorium. directed the program, Singing Sondheim, will include a wide variety of selections from such well known musicals as “Sweeny Todd,” “A Funny Thing Happened on the Way to the Forum” and “Into the Woods.”

    The program will be directed by Andr Garca-Nuthmann, Music Department program director, with Lydia Madrick at the piano.

  • In an effort to promote leadership and unity, both the Luna Community College and New Mexico Highlands University student government will sponsor a multicultural/spring concert from noon to 7 p.m. on Saturday, April 19 at the LCC campus.

    Admission to for the general public is $5. Luna Community College and Highlands University students get in free.

    Tickets are being sold at the Luna Community College ACCESS Center, Urban Wear, Love Music and Hacienda.

  • “Every religion emphasizes human improvement, love, respect for others, sharing other people’s suffering. On these lines every religion has more or less the same viewpoint and the same goal.” The Dalai Lama

    Below is a sampling of The Golden Rule, or Ethic of Reciprocity, as expressed in several different religions.

    •Baha’ii: “Blessed is he who preferreth his brother before himself.” Baha’ul’lah

    •Christianity: “And as ye would that men should do to you, do ye also to them likewise.” Luke 6:31

  • Abundancia manager Linzy Behr grins as she dons a black knit poncho. The echo of playful dogs reverberates through the newly-renovated second-hand store as artist Alex Ellis joins in the fun, pulling a thick “pleather” jacket from a plastic hanger.

    “This store has a new breath of life,” says Ellis. He sweeps one arm across his body, showcasing the neatly-arranged merchandise. “Linzy’s done an incredible job with this place.”

  • I started off as an 11-year- old at my Uncle Martin’s tennis camp. I had a racket with rainbow colored strings and I entertained myself by picking up all the balls and dropping them right before I got to the basket. To me, it was basically an hour or two to socialize and cause trouble with my younger cousin, Ali.

  • Soft yellow paint coats the rounded corners of an adobe storefront lining the Las Vegas Plaza, giving sunlight opportunity to cast shadow against a recessed door. Delicate ristras, ochre paint clinging to the rough surface, echo a white sign offering burritos smothered in red or green. Nancy Philo’s painting of JB’s Tortilla Cones’ facade offers a humorous zen koan, a painting of a painting.

    “Las Vegas inspires me to paint,” Philo muses, “the interplay of old and new, the unusual nooks and crannies. I can’t imagine a better subject.”

  • There are a lot of things which can be done to increase comfort, save money, and help protect the environment, all at the same time. Synergy Fest 2008 will feature a wide range of exhibits and activities revealing how those three aims—and others—are in “synergy.”

    On board this year is a variety of local and state government and educational agencies, many for the first time. There are many resources available to the community that readers may not be aware of. For example:

  • A Japanese monk lifted an empty teapot, passing an empty cup, ritualistically savoring bitter tea that no longer exists as a chorus of monks sang “though the bowl is empty, the scent glows.”

    Members of the Las Vegas Guild of the Santa Fe Opera leaned forward, let the music, as fine and enlightening as vapor from steaming green tea waft over them during the American premiere of Tan Dun’s opera, Tea, last August in Santa Fe.

  • Las Vegas’ Solid Waste Department is solidly behind recycling, and they would like residents to know about it.

    Kelly Eversole, the departments’ Keep America Beautiful Coordinator, says that the city is accepting recycled plastic, paper, cardboard, tin, steel, aluminum and e-waste, including computers, at the transfer station. There is no charge for recycling these items.

    The city is already managing a large volume of recyclable materials. “We shipped out 109.56 tons of recycling from January through March of this year” Eversole said.

  • In a restaurant just around the corner from the Optic hangs a picture of John and Jacqueline Kennedy sitting on a boat of some sort, laughing and looking so happy, so carefree, that it’s hard to believe they really existed. Eating lunch at a table across from this picture, I began to think about the American dream.

  • The Sangre de Cristo mountains loom between high desert and open plains, protecting a circular valley that once housed quiet ranchlands, an important stage stop on the Santa Fe Trail. Today the land is marked with blood, the site of the Civil War’s “Gettysburg of the West,” the Battle of Glorieta Pass.

    Traveler’s driving down Interstate 25 might notice a dirt drive housing a hand-painted red, white, and blue memorial, covered in eclectic messages.

  • The sound of the shutter surprises a nesting sparrow. Elena Gallegos points her camera at what seems to be nothing — a wisp of dried sweetgrass, a dusty stone, the crack between two slabs of concrete. She tries to steady her hands. Click. Click. The sparrow flits from one branch to another, curious, aware.

  • New Mexico Department of Agriculture announced today that funding will be available under the New Mexico Specialty Crops Program.

    Funds are available to New Mexico organizations and individuals that have a long-term commitment to improving the economic viability of New Mexico’s rural economy or have projects with a significant value-added potential.

  • Chickens are a godsend for organic gardeners and farmers. Needing only basic care, they sally forth into gardens, devouring with gusto pests such as grasshoppers and slugs which often decimate crops, and converting them into fertilizer and healthy, free range eggs and meat.

    But can chickens be legally kept in the city of Las Vegas? I asked Thomas Garza, Las Vegas' director of animal control; Garza said that chickens can be kept in the city, and helpfully provided the City's Animal Control Ordinance, which has this to say about keeping chickens:

  • Solar energy systems are good for the environment and good for your wallet. For every kilowatt-hour of electricity generated by solar energy instead of a coal-fired power plant, greenhouse gas emissions are reduced by two pounds of carbon dioxide (CO2) and three-quarters of a gallon of water is saved.

  • The first thing that strikes the listener is that the woman’s voice is stone cold melodic, even, unafraid. She stands at a microphone, her head cocked to one side as she interlaces curt words, deliberate ideas, into a rug tightly-woven enough to carry weight. Her gestures suggest necessary defiance, the aural transfer of sacred inalienable truth.

  • I'm sitting on the floor next to the woodstove listening to the radio

    it's bringing me voices of protest against the war

    tens of thousands from all over the country

    angry

    righteous

    drumming voices

    when slowly i begin to weep

    seep

    then im sobbing bent forward into my hands it all comes rushing out of my

    shoulders out of my spine

    which must be where ive been putting all of those endless stories of death

    the 8.4 billion a month spent

    the seemingly unstoppable abuse of power

  • As three movies were filming in town last month I came to realize that the world has discovered our secret, and how great Las Vegas really is.

    When I drive down Seventh and Eighth streets, I see rows of Victorian homes. On the west side of town there are hundreds of traditional southwestern homes, which show off the architecture of the original Las Vegas. I am told that the same houses in another part of the country would cost five to 10 times as much and that the Victorians would be priced at least $1 million.

  • My Polish grandma died five years ago. Babcia lived in the middle apartment of a triple tenement house in New England for all of her married life. She worked all those years, too, in a beat-up shoe factory she called the “coop.” When I was a kid, I thought she meant it like a chicken coop, a place of barbed wire and rows of feathered ladies like hens producing shiny patent leather inventory. Later I learned it was really short for The Cooperative. Babcia spent long days drilling tiny holes into men’s wing- tipped shoes. She was an artist.