.....Advertisement.....
.....Advertisement.....

Features

  • There are a lot of things which can be done to increase comfort, save money, and help protect the environment, all at the same time. Synergy Fest 2008 will feature a wide range of exhibits and activities revealing how those three aims—and others—are in “synergy.”

    On board this year is a variety of local and state government and educational agencies, many for the first time. There are many resources available to the community that readers may not be aware of. For example:

  • A Japanese monk lifted an empty teapot, passing an empty cup, ritualistically savoring bitter tea that no longer exists as a chorus of monks sang “though the bowl is empty, the scent glows.”

    Members of the Las Vegas Guild of the Santa Fe Opera leaned forward, let the music, as fine and enlightening as vapor from steaming green tea waft over them during the American premiere of Tan Dun’s opera, Tea, last August in Santa Fe.

  • Las Vegas’ Solid Waste Department is solidly behind recycling, and they would like residents to know about it.

    Kelly Eversole, the departments’ Keep America Beautiful Coordinator, says that the city is accepting recycled plastic, paper, cardboard, tin, steel, aluminum and e-waste, including computers, at the transfer station. There is no charge for recycling these items.

    The city is already managing a large volume of recyclable materials. “We shipped out 109.56 tons of recycling from January through March of this year” Eversole said.

  • In a restaurant just around the corner from the Optic hangs a picture of John and Jacqueline Kennedy sitting on a boat of some sort, laughing and looking so happy, so carefree, that it’s hard to believe they really existed. Eating lunch at a table across from this picture, I began to think about the American dream.

  • The Sangre de Cristo mountains loom between high desert and open plains, protecting a circular valley that once housed quiet ranchlands, an important stage stop on the Santa Fe Trail. Today the land is marked with blood, the site of the Civil War’s “Gettysburg of the West,” the Battle of Glorieta Pass.

    Traveler’s driving down Interstate 25 might notice a dirt drive housing a hand-painted red, white, and blue memorial, covered in eclectic messages.

  • The sound of the shutter surprises a nesting sparrow. Elena Gallegos points her camera at what seems to be nothing — a wisp of dried sweetgrass, a dusty stone, the crack between two slabs of concrete. She tries to steady her hands. Click. Click. The sparrow flits from one branch to another, curious, aware.

  • New Mexico Department of Agriculture announced today that funding will be available under the New Mexico Specialty Crops Program.

    Funds are available to New Mexico organizations and individuals that have a long-term commitment to improving the economic viability of New Mexico’s rural economy or have projects with a significant value-added potential.

  • Chickens are a godsend for organic gardeners and farmers. Needing only basic care, they sally forth into gardens, devouring with gusto pests such as grasshoppers and slugs which often decimate crops, and converting them into fertilizer and healthy, free range eggs and meat.

    But can chickens be legally kept in the city of Las Vegas? I asked Thomas Garza, Las Vegas' director of animal control; Garza said that chickens can be kept in the city, and helpfully provided the City's Animal Control Ordinance, which has this to say about keeping chickens:

  • Solar energy systems are good for the environment and good for your wallet. For every kilowatt-hour of electricity generated by solar energy instead of a coal-fired power plant, greenhouse gas emissions are reduced by two pounds of carbon dioxide (CO2) and three-quarters of a gallon of water is saved.

  • The first thing that strikes the listener is that the woman’s voice is stone cold melodic, even, unafraid. She stands at a microphone, her head cocked to one side as she interlaces curt words, deliberate ideas, into a rug tightly-woven enough to carry weight. Her gestures suggest necessary defiance, the aural transfer of sacred inalienable truth.

  • I'm sitting on the floor next to the woodstove listening to the radio

    it's bringing me voices of protest against the war

    tens of thousands from all over the country

    angry

    righteous

    drumming voices

    when slowly i begin to weep

    seep

    then im sobbing bent forward into my hands it all comes rushing out of my

    shoulders out of my spine

    which must be where ive been putting all of those endless stories of death

    the 8.4 billion a month spent

    the seemingly unstoppable abuse of power

  • As three movies were filming in town last month I came to realize that the world has discovered our secret, and how great Las Vegas really is.

    When I drive down Seventh and Eighth streets, I see rows of Victorian homes. On the west side of town there are hundreds of traditional southwestern homes, which show off the architecture of the original Las Vegas. I am told that the same houses in another part of the country would cost five to 10 times as much and that the Victorians would be priced at least $1 million.

  • My Polish grandma died five years ago. Babcia lived in the middle apartment of a triple tenement house in New England for all of her married life. She worked all those years, too, in a beat-up shoe factory she called the “coop.” When I was a kid, I thought she meant it like a chicken coop, a place of barbed wire and rows of feathered ladies like hens producing shiny patent leather inventory. Later I learned it was really short for The Cooperative. Babcia spent long days drilling tiny holes into men’s wing- tipped shoes. She was an artist.

  • A middle-aged women sits on a rugged brick floor, arms folded tightly across her chest, a thick plaid blanket tucked around her waist. A corner of white fabric lies next to her, suggesting a selection of unseen tooled silver, perhaps tiny spiral earrings, or delicate belt conchos in the shape of the zia. Her slightly pained expression speaks of fatigue, of crisp Santa Fe air. Deborah Paisner’s oil painting, “Carol at the Palace of Governors,” examines contemplation, waiting, longing — the emotions of time, the emotions of every working woman.

  • The National Park Service and Fort Union National Monument announces its monthly “Glimpses of the Past” presentation entitled “Footlights in the Foothills, A Glimpse of the Theatrical Past of Las Vegas and Fort Union.”

  • “It’s bigger, and people are appreciating the roominess” said Nancy Colalillo, owner of Tome on the Range.

    It’s no surprise. Tome on the Range relocated to much roomier digs last Friday, and the new space, at 158 Bridge Street, is not just bigger, it’s better.

    The first improvement is in used books. Tome on the Range specialized in new books, with its sister store, Second Tome Around, focusing on used books. But Second Tome Around closed last year.

  • Holy Week begins Sunday with an event chronicled in all four Gospels — Palm Sunday, a remembrance of Jesus’ triumphal entry into Jerusalem, when people lining the road pressed their best cloaks, pressed branches of small trees into the dry earth before him in a gesture of admiration and respect.

    Today, Catholics hold stark green blessed palm fronds, or boughs of native trees, during Palm Sunday Mass as they participate in the Lord’s Passion, a recital of Jesus’ last steps before death and resurrection.

  • A good friend of mine often says that anything is possible, but not everything is possible. This will probably never be as clear as it is at 17 and 18. Let me explain.

  • New Mexico Department of Agriculture (NMDA) announced today that funding will be available under the New Mexico Specialty Crops Program. Funds are available to New Mexico organizations and individuals that have a long-term commitment to improving the economic viability of New Mexico’s rural economy or have projects with a significant value-added potential.

  • The Taos County Economic Development Corporation, or TCEDC, has a mobile Matanza which slaughters beef, pigs and sheep for ranchers and can have them packaged for sale to consumers. The Matanza will travel as far south as Las Vegas, and can slaughter and hang up to 16 head of beef at a time.