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Features

  • A woman and man dance, arms arched together in continuous embrace. The woman’s hair cascades down her shoulders, following the curve of her back. Her right foot reaches beneath her man’s legs, giving the terra cotta sculpture a breath of captured movement, of music

  • A row of Las Vegans stand at the front of the First United Presbyterian altar prior to Sunday service, smarty dressed in white dress shirts and black cotton gloves. They wait, each holding the handle of a gilded bell.

    Conductor Karyl Lyne raises her arms, pointing at one ringer, then another, coaxing tones into the sanctuary. A cascade of clear chimes fills the space. The music is gentle, familiar, reminiscent of Christmas, of old-fashioned weddings. The ringers concentrate, lifting each bell and thrusting it with precision.

  • A disciplined and serious — and lighthearted — group of young people prowled and pounced around the wood-floored room. They were practicing a song from the musical Cats. Clear strong voices filled the air. This group of sixteen singers from the West Las Vegas High School Honors Choir will delight music-lovers at the City of Las Vegas Museum on Wednesday, May 21, at 6 p.m. The program is sponsored by the Friends of the City of Las Vegas Museum.

  • For years, East vs. West was the biggest high school rivalry. Everything seemed to be measured by if you played for Robertson or West. Every football game and basketball game was sold out and the season’s success was determined by whether you defeated the cross-town rival.

  • As the school year snakes toward summer, school workers across the county hold their breath in anticipation, wait for the last bell to chime, the last report card to compose, the last classroom to clean.

    The end of May means graduation preparation, means prom music and decorations to choose, means exhibit and event designed to showcase each student’s intellectual, social, and artistic progress throughout the academic year.

  • As of today, Robertson High School seniors have only 17 schools days left on the calendar. Though time seems to be passing slower than ever before, we will be graduates in no time.

  • What did kids do on a sunny day 150 years ago, before the invention of the iPod, mp3 player, X-box or cell phone? Children can find out on Saturday, April 26, 2008, at Fort Union National Monument when the National Park Service celebrates Junior Ranger Day. This is in association with National Park Week, specifically “kids in parks” and away from the TV and video games. By celebrating the Junior Ranger program, children are connected to American history and the natural and urban wonders within our parks. The program urges children to explore and protect these resources.

  • Demogorgon’s music hits the listener’s ears with a surprising mix of melodic electric guitar arpeggios accented by driving drum riffs and a lead singer’s deliberately muffled lyrics.

  • A ceramic buddha laughs, his skin the hue of weathered copper. He holds a twist of prayer beads below an expanded belly, tiny legs folded on a vibrant purple lotus bud.

    The careful work of NMHU art student Mc Kaila Dorman, the sculpture is on display through May 1 as part of the semiannual Student Art Show at the Burris Hall Gallery.

    “This is something we do every semester,” explains Highlands Associate Professor of Art, David Lobdell. “We try to create a program that gives students the opportunity to be trained professionally.”

  • McAlister Lake rests in a bowl-shaped depression on the edge of the Great Plains, 100 acres of deceptively still waters.

    Part of the Las Vegas National Wildlife Refuge, the lake is respite and home to birds as well as fish stocked by the New Mexico Department of Game and Fish. Last year, the lake grew silent, grew dry, when a mixup at the state offices resulted in the forgotten scheduled delivery of water from Storrie Lake. Today, the waters rise high, thanks to winter's snowfall.

  • The first year Theatre Arts Students at UWC-USA will shake up Shakespeare on The United World College campus, in Montezuma, on Wednesday, April 23.

    The students will perform both The Merchant of Venice (in the Kluge Auditorium at 7 p.m.) and Twelfth Night (beside the Sasakawa Center at 5 p.m.) as part of Shakespeare 24, the largest ever international youth Shakespeare festival.

  • Carrie Newcomer sits in silence each morning in her Indiana home, in meditation, in gentle prayer, her music set aside for deliberate contemplation.

    A practicing Quaker, the folk musician believes in the power of love and reflection to overcome violence and injustice, and in the ways that our spirits are revived by spending time in solitude.

  • Lively numbers by Chuck Mangione, Duke Ellington, Dean Sorenson and Dizzy Gillespie will ring Ilfeld Auditorium during the Swing and Latin pulse of the New Mexico Highlands University Concert Band and Jazz Ensemble in a concert on April 18 at 7 p.m.

    Featured pieces include Fly Me to the Moon, Caravan and Birdland. This semester’s concert and jazz band includes students who major and minor in music performance and education.

  • Music has always been a large part of my life.

    Since I was little my dad used to make me watch the movie Amadeus with him, so I could learn about Mozart and classical music. We watched musicals together, such as My Fair Lady, Grease, Jesus Christ Superstar, and The Sound of Music, which are still all some of my favorites.

  • The New Mexico Highlands Concert Choir will perform works by one of America’s most distinguished Broadway composers and lyricists for its spring program April 20 at 3 p.m. in Ilfeld Auditorium. directed the program, Singing Sondheim, will include a wide variety of selections from such well known musicals as “Sweeny Todd,” “A Funny Thing Happened on the Way to the Forum” and “Into the Woods.”

    The program will be directed by Andr Garca-Nuthmann, Music Department program director, with Lydia Madrick at the piano.

  • In an effort to promote leadership and unity, both the Luna Community College and New Mexico Highlands University student government will sponsor a multicultural/spring concert from noon to 7 p.m. on Saturday, April 19 at the LCC campus.

    Admission to for the general public is $5. Luna Community College and Highlands University students get in free.

    Tickets are being sold at the Luna Community College ACCESS Center, Urban Wear, Love Music and Hacienda.

  • “Every religion emphasizes human improvement, love, respect for others, sharing other people’s suffering. On these lines every religion has more or less the same viewpoint and the same goal.” The Dalai Lama

    Below is a sampling of The Golden Rule, or Ethic of Reciprocity, as expressed in several different religions.

    •Baha’ii: “Blessed is he who preferreth his brother before himself.” Baha’ul’lah

    •Christianity: “And as ye would that men should do to you, do ye also to them likewise.” Luke 6:31

  • Abundancia manager Linzy Behr grins as she dons a black knit poncho. The echo of playful dogs reverberates through the newly-renovated second-hand store as artist Alex Ellis joins in the fun, pulling a thick “pleather” jacket from a plastic hanger.

    “This store has a new breath of life,” says Ellis. He sweeps one arm across his body, showcasing the neatly-arranged merchandise. “Linzy’s done an incredible job with this place.”

  • I started off as an 11-year- old at my Uncle Martin’s tennis camp. I had a racket with rainbow colored strings and I entertained myself by picking up all the balls and dropping them right before I got to the basket. To me, it was basically an hour or two to socialize and cause trouble with my younger cousin, Ali.

  • Soft yellow paint coats the rounded corners of an adobe storefront lining the Las Vegas Plaza, giving sunlight opportunity to cast shadow against a recessed door. Delicate ristras, ochre paint clinging to the rough surface, echo a white sign offering burritos smothered in red or green. Nancy Philo’s painting of JB’s Tortilla Cones’ facade offers a humorous zen koan, a painting of a painting.

    “Las Vegas inspires me to paint,” Philo muses, “the interplay of old and new, the unusual nooks and crannies. I can’t imagine a better subject.”