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Features

  • Highlands University’s Performing Arts Club will present “An Afternoon With the Romantics” July 28 at 3 p.m. in Kennedy Hall at 905 University Ave.

    The music of Romantic period composers Brahms and Chopin will be featured, including a highlight of 18 Brahms waltzes. Arias from the same time period, about 1812 to the early 1900s, are also on the program. Beethoven, a Classical-era composer who helped usher in the Romantic period, is also included in the repertoire.

  • A man with a thick drooping mustache barreled into Las Vegas. He bellied up to the Plaza Hotel saloon bar, scores of his rowdy companions drowning their seat-saddle pain with shots of cheap whiskey. Teddy Roosevelt didn’t ride a Harley, but only because they hadn’t been invented yet.

    This weekend, the third annual Rough Rider Motorcycle Rally coaxes a new breed of frontiersmen to the Plaza.

  • James sat on the edge of the Sea of Galilee. The water shimmered, its choppy surface echoing the deep azure of Israel’s morning sky. He held a fishing net in his hands, his fingers carefully darning small holes ripped by the tides.

    His brother and father sat near him, and as they worked, they noticed a peaceful man striding with purpose toward them. Follow me, the man said. James and his brother felt the tug of something divine, something clear and wondrous. They handed their father the repaired nets and placed sandaled feet into wet sand, into a new life with Jesus.

  • If it’s summer in Las Vegas, that must mean Missoula Children’s theatre.

    This acclaimed performance group is once again headed to our city. This year, their touring production is Robin Hood. And, this also means that local children from the first through 12th grades will have the opportunity to audition for the play. The touring group is scheduled for Las Vegas from July 28 through August 2.

  • Theres something about thunder that excites me. It reminds me of when I was little and I used to scream at every loud boom and hide under the table. Or of when my family would be driving somewhere and I would count the seconds between each flash of lightning, to figure out how close it was.

  • In a career spanning more than 40, writer, radio producer and aural historian Jack Loeffler has turned sound—human voices, as well as manmade, natural and mechanical sounds of all types—into history.

    In his new book, Survival Along the Continental Divide: An Anthology of Interviews, Jack Loeffler enlists the voices and ideas of a dozen leading regional scholars and activists to create a lively and enlightening look at the complex forces that have shaped the way New Mexicans define their communities and themselves.

  • The Immaculate Heart of Mary bursts into leaping orange flame next to the sword-pierced heart of her resurrected Son. A twisted ring of thorns presses into Mary’s flesh, transmitting the pain a Mother breathes for her child. Jesus’ heart stands behind His mother, a silent sentry promising rest.

  • Local artist and photographer Marisol Macias sees ghosts. Well, in the eye of her imagination, at least.

    A collection of Macias’ work, titled “Ghost signs, Ghost Stories,” is on exhibit at Highland University’s Ray Drew Gallery from July 12 through Aug. 10.

  • Theresa Jaramillo and Thomas Martinez are brother and sister, who, after years of working together at local eateries, decided to take a leap of faith; in November 2007, together with Theresa’s husband, Earnest, they took over D’Vino’s restaurant at El Fidel Hotel.

    “It comes naturally to us” said Thomas. “We grew up around the stove, where someone was always cooking. Theresa learned to make rice when she was 5.”

    “We learned from dad and mom, and grandma Tere,” Theresa said.

  • A band whose music has been described as “Sweet island Latin with a jazzy flair of vocals and instrumental solos,” Los Tropicales, was formed 12 years ago in New Mexico.

  • The smell of roasted corn and the vivid music of a mariachi band fill the hot July air. Friends and families are talking and laughing throughout the park. It seems you have found your way to the plaza, where the annual Fourth of July Fiestas are in full swing. Sound interesting?

  • The road to Vida Encantada Nursing and Rehab twists past a subdivision littered with toddlers’ toys, past the great prairie’s golden summer grasses, past the long curved road of life that leads most of its residents home here.

  • Sometimes archaeological treasures turn up in unexpected places. Such is the case with items from a traveling exhibit titled “Outhouse Archaeology” that is displayed at the Las Vegas City Museum this summer.

    The exhibit’s contents come from a historic outhouse located on New Mexico Highlands University’s campus. Expansion of the Donnelly Library in 1995 led to the discovery of a house foundation and outhouse. Highland’s Anthropology Laboratory, under direction of Robert Mishler, excavated the site.

  • This musical and cultural extravaganza will light up the night with Mariachi Music. Old music will find new voices as members of Mariachi Cardenal Infantil, Mariachi Cardenal Juvenil, Mariachi Pantera, Mariachi Sol del Valle, Mariachi Luna de Plata and Mariachi Paisano del Valle present their favorite songs for a concert at the Memorial Middle School Gym this Saturday, June 28, starting at 7 p.m. Baile Ilusion will dance to their set of traditional Mexican folklore songs.

  • The parking lot at University Avenue and Sixth Street bursts with flavor each Wednesday and Saturday now that summer is upon us.

    Farmers drive from the outskirts of town, sometimes from Texas and Oklahoma, to share round lemon cucumbers, deep purple grapes, brown paper bags filled with spinach leaves. June at the Las Vegas Farmers’ Market means the first tender greens, means succulent organic strawberries, means baskets of elongated lime-green pods filled with delectable sweet peas.

  • Summertime is the season that everyone waits for — it means warm weather, barbeques, and most importantly...no school! It means baseball games and swimming and fishing. It means happiness.

    This is the first summer I’m not completely busy. It’s the first summer in a few years that I’ll actually be here for the Fourth of July. Last year I was out of the country for the fourth, so the celebration meant nothing to the British people I was surrounded by. I was disappointed to have missed the fiestas, one of my favorite parts of summer.

  • The black locomotives of the first trains in New Mexico territory belched hot white steam into the tree-lined skies. The Mexican-American war had ended, had left deep distrust in the hearts of the territory citizens, many of whom had lost entire families in the bloody dispute. The largest city in the territory those days was Las Vegas, N.M., a bustling destination with a new depot on the railroad.

  • Two years ago, taggers hit the side of my garage that faces one of Las Vegas’ alleys, hit it with white aerosol spray in the shape of a Halloween ghost surrounded by bulging initials. It wasn’t the first time; black paint covered most of the space in a feeble attempt to cover a prior message. I gave up the ghost, left the imprint to bake in the sun.

  • The Tri-County Farmers’ Market opens for the season on Saturday, June 21. Many of the old faces will be there, with some new ones as well. Daniel Hern, president of the Farmers’ Market, said that several new farmers are participating, and that the Market is looking to expand its venue to include craftspeople and also bakers and others who will be selling processed food items.

  • A set of rustic chairs, His and Hers, each painted with the visage of artist Grant Wood’s famous coupling, “American Gothic,” rests in Carol Baldwin’s home art studio.

    The chairs seem to hold a conversation with one another, pitchforked farmer stern and willful against a quiet woman, her hair pulled back into a severe bun. A shorter chair watches the exchange. Painted with Wood’s depiction of adolescence, a pin-feathered chicken, it eyes the couple with one watery eye.