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Features

  • ‘This town is parade crazy,” says Tito Chavez.  “And this parade (electric light parade) is one of the most interesting and really the most unique of them all.”

    Chavez and his wife, Mary, own Tito’s Gallery on Bridge Street. They have seen lots of parades pass by. He also remembers building lots of floats for the electric light parade in years past.

  • Thanksgiving just passed, and while my turkey day usually consists of eating too much and falling asleep by 3 p.m., this year it was different.

    My family and I went to Durango, Colo., for a new twist on Thanksgiving.

    As we were arriving in Durango, it was snowing like crazy. And this year, there was no turkey. (Well, not until Saturday, anyway.) For our Thanksgiving feast, we had Denny’s — that’s right, Denny’s. Nothing else seemed to be open, but it was OK because it made this Thanksgiving something new and totally different.

  • Magic Lance: Mystery and Adventure in the New West, Hal Simmons

    Clear Light Publishing

    Santa Fe, N.M., 2008, $14.95

     

    Wonderful proposition — what would happen if the tribes of New Mexico banded together and used the money they are making out of gambling for a common goal? What if land acquisition were the goal? What if a thinly disguised Ted Turner also wants to acquire land?

    “Magic Lance: Mystery and Adventure in the New West” is thoroughly enjoyable with recognizable and likeable personalities.

  • The HU Singers will perform “A Tim Burton Christmas” at 8 p.m. Friday, Dec. 5, and Saturday, Dec. 6, in New Mexico Highlands’ Ilfeld Auditorium. The program features musical numbers from “The Nightmare Before Christmas” and “The Corpse Bride.” 

  • The NMHU Concert Band will kick off the holiday season in Ilfeld Auditorium Sunday, Nov. 23 at 3p.m.

    The Highlands Faculty Brass Quintet and Highlands Marching and Concert Band will perform such favorites as “Sleigh Ride” and “The Christmas Song,”“Semper Fidelis,” and Five pieces by 17th-century composer Anthony Holborne. Modern pieces include“Back in Black”, and John Bon Jovi’s “You Give Love a Bad Name.”

  • Oprah’s Book Club is one book club that almost everyone knows about. Oprah has singlehandedly awakened adult interest in reading books and discussing them with others.

    She has served the same purpose as Harry Potter—his author’s influence on pre-teen reading has been nothing less than spectacular.

  • In 2006, Patricia Crespín’s first play, “We Are Hispanic American Women ... Okay!” opened in Las Vegas, New Mexico.  In November 2008, her career as a playwright comes full circle when “Confessions of a Hispanic American Woman” premiers in Las Vegas, as well.

  • Now, the economy just doesn’t affect the adults, it affects the younger crowd too.

    With the crazy gas prices (which are actually getting better) and the money that has to go toward school, I would have never guessed that this would effect me the way it has.

    Now that I have a car and drive myself everywhere, I’ve noticed that most of my money has gone straight toward gas, and I have to say my car is not the most efficient on gas. It’s good, but it has a big tank so when I go to fill it up it takes about 30 dollars or more.

  • “The Harvey Girls” will be the theme for the 2008 Las Vegas Citizens’ Committee for Historic Preservation Annual Preservation Awards Dinner, which will be held at the former Harvey House Hotel, the Montezuma Castle at the United World College of the American West.  

  • Environmental friendliness, or what we call “green,” is enjoying unprecedented popularity. Hollywood celebrities can now be seen on cable TV showing off the solar panels on their multi-million dollar mansions.

    Indeed, you will even hear that “green is the new black.”

    On one level, that’s great. It’s hard to find fault with people seeking to reduce their environmental footprint. But on another level, it’s troubling.

  • Say solar energy and people immediately think about high tech solar panels and sophisticated electronics. While that’s one way to capture solar energy, price puts it out of the hands of many. There’s one form of solar, though, that is within the grasp of of most of us, and that is passive solar heating.

    In its simplest form, passive solar heating means  setting up your home and land to make maximum use of the sun’s heat.

  • It’s a funny show about serious issues — an evening of song,  dance and good clean musical fun on the themes of racism, naziism, homosexuality, and other adult topics.

  • It’s sad to see that even today people are judged by the color of their skin, the way they talk, their hair, the way they look, etc. It’s not right! But it still happens.

    Everywhere you go, you can be judged by either the way you look or talk.

    Because of judgment, a lot of people are afraid to be who they really are, because they are afraid of what people may say.

  • Change is definitely something that this country needs. During these past months this country has seen great change taking over.

    A women was nominated to be a candidate for presidency and an African-American man might just be our next president. What’s even more incredible is that now, more than ever, people are starting to let their voices be heard.

  • The National Park Service and Fort Union National Monument announces its monthly “Glimpses of the Past” presentation. The program will be held at the Citizens Committee for Historic Preservation/Santa Fe Trail Interpretive Center, 116 Bridge St., in Las Vegas, Thursday Nov. 20 at 7 p.m.

  • Well-known artist Eddie Dominguez is working with fine art students on the Highlands University campus as part of the new Nina Tesla Ballen Visiting Professor Gift Program. The program includes events for the public.

    David Lobdell, Fine Art Department professor and program coordinator, said Dominguez is the first to visit the Highlands campus as part of the new visiting professor program. The program will allow Highlands to host visiting professors from different academic disciplines.

  • The bent, tortured wail  of an electric guitar slices through the smoke and the noise like a razor. A singer shouts  out from the heart, his voice full of hurt and gravel, singing of lost love and hard luck. He cries out and his guitar cries back.

    It could only be the blues.

    This Sunday, Nov. 16, local blues and rock band Unfinished Business with bring this soulful music to the El Fidel Hotel. The band will perform from 2 to 4:30 p.m. There is a $6 cover charge, and rooms are available for those who wish to stay for the night.

  • Sun salutations, yoga for fitness, yoga flow: what’s it all about?

    The ancient practice of yoga came to America about 40  years ago from India but now is “mainstream” in America according to Henrietta Griego, a certified and registered yoga teacher. It offers people these basic benefits: balance, strength, flexibility along with focusing attention and calming the mind.

  • Thomas Jefferson drafted the Declaration of Independence on it.

    Levi Strauss jeans were originally made from it.

    Spaniards first brought it to the Americas and cultivated it in Chile. Wide-spread cultivation of it in the USA occurred during WWII.

    What is it?

    It is Cannabis sativa … better known as industrial hemp.

    The cultivation and use of hemp in goes back at least 10,000 years. Today more than 30 nations produce industrial hemp including the major players: Canada, China, Ukraine and other European Union nations.

  • “Those who can’t do, teach.”

    That might be the slogan of the injured birds, unable to live in the wild, who will be teaching program participants about raptors and their habits this weekend at the Las Vegas National Wildlife Refuge.  

    Presentations will be held at the Refuge at noon and 1:30 p.m., Sunday, Nov. 9. volunteers from the Santa Fe Raptor Center will bring predatory birds which have been injured too severely to be returned to the wild.