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Features

  • The Robertson High School class of 1959 celebrated its 50th anniversary with a class reunion July 30-31.

    The get-together started with dinner at the Sandia Resort and Casino in Albuquerque. There were some 38 classmates in attendance, which included their spouses. They had a good time, going so far as revealing who had a crush on whom back in the 10th grade.

  • Well, it’s that time of year again, and the city has once again decreed that I can only water my garden on Tuesdays.

    It’s uncanny, really.

    There is nothing in nature to suggest that the plants in my garden now need only half the watering they needed just two weeks ago.

    So the city has placed me in the same dilemma as many Las Vegans who are looking to grow food in their backyards — shall I obey authority and let my tomatoes and squash shrivel and die or must I become a scofflaw in the name of food security?

  • New Mexico Highlands University chemistry professor David Sammeth participated in an intensive two-week program in July to study global sustainability at the prestigious Santa Fe Institute.  

    The program, co-sponsored by the National Renewable Energy Laboratory, explored global sustainability with a focus on climate change. Twenty national and international scientists, economists, social scientists, and policy makers presented at the program.

  • The Las Vegas Peace and Justice Center celebrated its fifth anniversary in May. and it continues to serve the citizens of the Meadow City using a model based on the civil rights movement, whereby the community shapes the work.

    Twelve years ago, Patricia “Pat” Leahan arrived in Las Vegas to continue the work she had been doing in Minnesota in social work and teaching.

  • With a model’s looks and humble demeanor, Holly Holm might not look like a professional fighter.

    But the preacher’s daughter packs a punch that has taken her to the top of the boxing world. The IBA Junior Welterweight Wold Champion will perform in front of a Las Vegas audience this Friday at Wilson Complex. She will take on Terri Blair of Louisville, Ky.

    Holm was in Las Vegas last week to meet fans and give a motivational talk to students at the two school districts.

  • Perhaps you’ve sighted Bill Oshima on his 1973 Raleigh (once called the Cadillac of Bicycles) as he pedals toward the recreation center for a yoga workout; maybe you spotted him hiking the river trail to El Sombrero or to the bank at SECU. You might have done a double take as he pops out of his back yard wearing a bee mask or wields his push-mower and vanquishes the growth in his yard on Lincoln Avenue.

  • On the first day of school, Memorial Middle School teacher Clarabel Marquez has a way of getting kids to come out of their shell: They are introduced to Global Bingo, a game where they ask a number of questions and at the same time get to know each other.

    Students are given a global bingo sheet with a number of questions like: Who traveled out of New Mexico this summer? Who knows at least 10 names of states in the United States? Who knows the name of the mayor of Las Vegas?

  • Keith Salazar is considered the most decorated student that has passed through the halls of West Las Vegas Middle School.

    He won two national titles, was a national finalist in four events, earned 10 state championships and has four state runner-ups to his credit. But he said three years ago, he wanted nothing to do with Business Professionals of America.

    “I did not want to join it. I didn’t want to come to school dressed in a business suit. I didn’t want anything to do with it,” Salazar said.

  • It’s easy to catch their enthusiasm, if you can keep up with Miguel Angel and Georgina Ortega, as the couple work on a seemingly unending list of projects at one time.  

    Their personal stories are compelling, but they don’t want to talk about themselves.

    Angel and Ortega are passionate about talking about their work with Casa de Cultura, whose mission is to foster trust and cohesion among diverse ethnic and social groups, by getting involved in educational and cultural activities.

  • Major Gen. Kenny Montoya of the New Mexico National Guard told the audience at the 2009 Employer Appreciation Day luncheon last week that New Mexico soldiers are as busy as ever around the state. He also said fewer men and women from the state are being sent to Iraq.

    Montoya said a year ago, about 1,000 area troops were in combat. Now, there are 550 New Mexicans deployed.

  • On Thursday June 11, two speakers made presentations on Wind Turbine Noise to the Sustainable Las Vegas group. This meeting was part of SLV’s current efforts to inform the public about sustainable issues. This topic is especially timely since San Miguel County is currently revising their county wind ordinance to more adequately address the issue of the siting of large turbine wind towers.

  • Obviously proud of his family, heritage and service to his country and his fellow man, Erminio  “Ermie” Martinez radiates satisfaction and gratitude for the various opportunities afforded him during his 80 years of life.

    Born in Holman May 18, 1929, Ermie recalls his early years of schooling at Agua Negra Presbyterian School. Noting that his parents, aunts and uncles had attended this school, he says, “ It was not only the imposed discipline of the atmosphere” that impressed him, “but that they got the students interested.”

  • Weeds. We hate ‘em. It’s really a statement which is true based on definition of terms. “Weeds” is not a term which is meaningful in biological terms.

    A “weed” is simply a plant we don’t like. So when we label a plant a “weed,” we are actually communicating more about ourselves than we are about the plant of which we are speaking.

  • Local food is on the rebound, and I'm glad.

    We have an independent, mom and pop produce market on Grand Ave. They are selling local, free range eggs, and hope to be offering more local produce as they get established.

    Two years ago I couldn't find local, free range eggs.  Last year they were sporadically available at the Tri-County Farmers Market and through the Barter Hours program.

  • West Las Vegas Food Services Director Dean Gallegos says food at the schools aren’t typical of cafeterias. Students are served fresh fruits and vegetables, freshly baked biscuits, and hand-prepared entrees, he says.

    Gallegos doesn’t buy crates of frozen foods that just need to be thawed and heated or stuck in the microwave before serving.

    Before the West school board took formal action on food service bids for the coming year, Gallegos outlined his philosophy on serving the district’s students tasty and healthful meals.

  • For the past six years, Highlands University Spanish Professor Lillian Gorman has been taking a group of students on an adventure that is partly academic and partly an exploration of a new world.

    And it’s with an intense focus on the Spanish language. 

    Each summer, Gorman and about a dozen students spend two weeks immersed in the Spanish language at Casa Xalteva, a small orphanage and school in Nicaragua.

    Each year, the students return home with many stories and fond memories of the special time they spent there.

  • ROCIADA — Many people around here have heard of Pendaries Village in Rociada, but few know about Camp Davis, which is a few miles down the road.

    The camp, celebrating its 70th anniversary this year, features eight cabins, a dining hall and a recreation building, as well as opportunities for fishing, hiking and horseback riding.

    In the summer of 1939, Coach J. Mule and Liz Davis founded Camp Davis. In the 1940s, ‘50s and ‘60s, the Davises had hundreds of kids from Texas stay at the camp throughout the summers.

  • This year’s theme for the Las Vegas Fiestas is Nuestras Tradiciones, Nuestros Tesoros — Our Traditions, Our Treasures. Many Las Vegans consider Cipriano Aguilar one of the Meadow City’s great treasures.

    For the last 47 years, this mild-mannered educator and longtime radio personality has acted as the Fiestas master of ceremonies and historian.

    Aguilar began his master of ceremonies duties after Jesus Lopez Sr. turned the microphone over to him in 1962.

  • The 21st Century Summer Program has ended with a flourish of fun, games and a picnic for the 180 kids who participated in the month-long, activities packed program.

    “The kids had a blast, today was the last day of our summer program, and this was a way to end it with a lot of fun,” assistant coordinator Theresa Chavez said.

    Program Director Michell Aragon she wanted to treat the children to a nice time on the final day.

  • Roberto Rios, the new executive director of the Las Vegas-San Miguel Economic Development Corp., expects the group to take strong stands under his management.

    But he said the EDC would study issues closely before making any decisions.

    Rios took his new job June 1. Just two days later, he witnessed one of the bigger controversies that pit one part of the business community against another.

    At issue was a proposed film moratorium, which would have stopped all movie productions in Las Vegas until the city revised its regulations to better deal with them.