.....Advertisement.....
.....Advertisement.....

Features

  • Robertson High School’s Marr Gym was recently packed with students and parents.

    They weren’t there for a sporting event. Rather, they were honoring academic achievement of the school’s 275 students who have been making good grades this year.

    Superintendent Rick Romero said he thought it was important that people have an opportunity to see the good in the district. He said in recent times the school has received its share of bad publicity because of the actions of a few misguided people.

  • A generalization holds that one learns by interacting with others -- listening, speaking, reading, but what if one cannot hear? We might conclude that being unable to use one of these modalities would result in a disability.

    Not necessarily.

    Take Las Vegas’ Clarence and Faye Falvey. They stress that deafness or being hard-of-hearing is not a handicap, but rather -- a difference. Both were born into hearing and speaking families.

  • Minnijean Brown-Trickey says despite what many people say, she wasn’t courageous in walking past angry mobs to attend Little Rock’s Central High School in 1957.

    She just wanted to go to school.

    Brown-Trickey spoke to several hundred people at United World College on Sunday night, talking about her experiences as one of the Little Rock Nine, the black students who desegregated the Arkansas school under the protection of federal troops.

  • Unveiling a mural two days before Martin Luther King Day, Casa de Cultura Director Miguel Angel quoted King as saying, “Our goal is to create the beloved community, and this will create a qualitative change in our souls, as well as a qualitative change of our lives.”

    Angel said people must become more active in their community.

    “The youth are our focus. Dr. King used to say, ‘A community that does not esteem its youth has no future,’ and we take that to heart,” Angel said.

  • Dolores Maese told a large audience of family and friends that for the last 32 years she loved to go to work because every day she worked with heroes.

    “I have so much respect for those who lay their lives on the line, those who are on the front lines fighting fires, and those who manage the forests and state parks,” Maese said.

    Maese started with the U.S. Forest Service in 1978, rising from a clerk-typist at the Las Vegas Ranger District to a public affairs officer at the regional office in Santa Fe.

  • The words became more difficult as the spelling bee progressed at Paul D. Elementary School last week. And the younger kids began to drop out.

    But third-grader Austen King finished in the top three and stood with fifth-graders A.J Larrañaga and Connor Houdek, who won took first and second places respectively.

    In all spelling bees, there are lessons learned even when kids misspell a word. For example, one of the younger children spelled “honest,” O-N-E-S-T, which makes perfect phonetic sense, and was a lesson in silent consonants and vowels. 

  • Click here to view the School Consolidation Study in PDF format

  • Wendy Armijo doesn’t claim to be a teetotaler. And she won’t tell you to never drink.

    But she draws the line at drinking and driving.

    For the last eight years, Armijo has served as the coordinator for the San Miguel County DWI Planning Council. She says she comes to that role with an understanding.

  • Unlike many dog lovers, Leslie Moniot isn’t looking for purebreds. She prefers mutts.

    That’s because she’s interested in rescuing canines, and plenty of places exist for purebreds. Not so for mixed breeds.

    Over the summer, she moved from a small town in southern California to Romeroville. Since 2001, she’s been providing homes for dogs.

    She takes in large dogs from animal shelters, usually just before they are about to be put down.

  • The dapper gentleman wearing a steel-gray ascot that matches his suit waits at his front door.

    I fumble with my writing tools, exit the car and cross the street. Per his cachet of impeccable elegance, he kisses my hand in true gentlemanly fashion. I feel that “I have arrived.” I had looked forward to talking with this couple — the word was out that they are the essence of the true meaning of volunteerism.

  • I have walked the path on the Gallinas River from Bridge street to Independence street many times. It is a place which could be the better in some respects if we did less with it, or more to the point, less TO it.

  • There are a few vantages from which to view our current economic malaise.

    Some see it as an isolated bump in the road that can be fixed by the gummint doling out largesse to Wall Street and other failed ventures.

    Others, like myself, see  our current economic troubles as the first, spreading crack in an edifice on the verge of collapse.

    Let me tell you why.

  • When it comes to government, Robertson High School teacher Brenda Ortega-Benavidez’s students know much more than what the three branches of government are. They’re something of experts in political science.

    Her students have just returned from the state Capitol, where they took part in a Constitution Mock Congress competition. It was the first time RHS students placed in the statewide “We the People” Congress, tying for fourth place.

  • Students at Sierra Vista Elementary School found that a small gesture of kindness can create a lot of magic.

    Teacher Tom Conklin spearheaded a schoolwide drive for UNICEF raising $416.50 for underprivileged kids in many countries. He said the donations help with vaccinations, food, clean water, blankets, school books and many other necessities.  

    First-grader Amor Roybal said, “It made me feel good to collect money for the kids who are sick and don’t have any money or clothing.”

  • A unit of the New Mexico National Guard last week held an exercise with local agencies to prepare for the possibility of a hazardous materials incident.

    The 64th Civil Support Team from Rio Rancho supports state and local authorities for manmade and natural disasters and incidents involving weapons of mass destruction and hazardous materials.

  • Carmen Baca teaches both American and British literature at West Las Vegas High School. And she has a clear favorite between the two.

    “British literature. I’m more comfortable with it. I don’t know why,” she said. “American literature is dry.”

    A Las Vegas native, Baca has spent her entire 32-year teaching career in the West district. She spent her first six years at Valley Junior High, but she moved on to the high school in 1983.

  • “The Animals Thanksgiving" narrator Vincent Pacheco told his packed classroom at Sierra Vista Elementary that Thanksgiving Day is a happy holiday, filled with good eating and family fun. 

  • As this year draws to a close, those who want to take advantage of federal and state tax credits for the installation of a solar energy system on their 2009 tax returns need to act soon.

  • It’s winter again, cold, and there’s snow on the ground.

    But I LIKE snow on the ground. 

    Every time we get snow on the ground, it is a prime opportunity to go outside and do some basic observation.

  • The term “weight training” might suggest a roomful of hard bodies in a gym working on building their six packs and puffing as they lift huge barbells.

    Flip the scene to the Night Owl, where Karen Topping, an exercise instructor, stands in front of a bar counter on which a sound system pipes out “Duke of Earl,” “The Wanderer,” and other blasts from the past. It is almost reminiscent of sock hops of the ‘60s.