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Features

  • The Miss Las Vegas Scholarship Organization is sponsoring the Miss Las Vegas’ Outstanding Teen Pageant at 4 p.m. on Sunday, March 27 at the West Las Vegas High School Cafeteria.  

    The Miss Las Vegas’ Outstanding Teen Pageant is a preliminary of Miss America’s Outstanding Teen Pageant.  The phases of competition are interview, talent, sports wear, evening wear and on-stage question.   

  • Submitted to the Optic

    Alta Vista Regional Hospital will continue its monthly series of free seminars, health fairs, educational programs and interactive events that will focus on women. Healthy Woman programs are dedicated to improving the emotional, physical and fiscal well-being of both women and the families for which they care.

  • By Elizabeth deMare
    Submitted to the Optic

    The world exhales a stark and lonely breath this time of year. Trees as gray and naked as your great grandmother’s bones line the Las Vegas Plaza.

    February makes you consider the world through muddy-colored glasses. Everyone’s a world-class curmudgeon with spit to share. Everyone wants spring, wants tulips and dandelions to sprout from aching, frozen brain.    Any groundhog will tell you that you ain’t gonna get your wish, not for at least four weeks and most likely six.

  • Submitted to the Optic

    College Night 2011 is rescheduled to Feb. 28 due to a winter storm forecast for Feb. 9.

    New Mexico Highlands University and Luna Community College will sponsor the 12th annual College Night 2011 from 5 p.m to 7:30 p.m. at the Abe Montoya Recreation Center on North Grand  in Las Vegas.    

  • Submitted to the Optic

    Fort Union National Monument, a part of the National Park Service, has announced its monthly Glimpses of the Past program, “Treaty of Guadalupe Hidalgo,” to be held at 7 p.m. on Thursday, Feb. 17 at the CCHP/Santa Fé Trail Interpretive Center, 116 Bridge St., in Las Vegas.

  • By Lloyd Goding
    For the Optic

    Sustainable Las Vegas will be holding their their Annual Sustainable Homes Tour (formerly Solar Homes Tour) on Saturday, Jan. 22. The goal for the tour is to show people real-life examples of utilizing solar energy, and “sustainability” more generally.  These examples range from very low- to higher-tech: drying clothes on clotheslines, growing plants, passive solar heating and cooling, active solar water heating, photovoltaic (solar electric) installations, rainwater catcheent, and water and energy efficiency.

  • In their petition seeking to secure the San Miguel del Bado Land Grant in 1794, the 52 colonists stated as their primary reason that there was not sufficient water in Santa Fe to sustain the growing population and livestock there. (It appears that drought and an adequate water supply were problems even then). The petitioners also stated that many of them owned small parcels of land in Santa Fe, but it was not sufficient to support their large families.

  • Every Monday morning since January 2010, I have recounted the history of Las Vegas and San Miguel County over the airwaves of KFUN/KLVF. Tom McDonald has now invited me to do the same thing in a weekly column for the Optic, and we begin that journey today. This column is the first in what we hope will be a long-running series bringing to life the history of our area.

  • By Don Pace

    Las Vegas Optic

     

    Sierra Vista Elementary School fourth-grader Edwardo Gallegos stood before the Las Vegas Schools board last week expressing his concern and possible remedies to curb bullying at his school.

     

    “We are having some serious problems at my school. We have a lot of students who like to bully other students, and don’t respect others,” Gallegos told the board. 

     

  • Submit your calendar items and notices to dgiuliani@lasvegasoptic.com.
    • The Nat Gold Players is calling for more submissions of original short plays to be produced in the “Box Seats” series. The dramas should be between 10 and 20 minutes, involve no more than four actors and use a minimal setting of up to four boxes. Hand props and costumes can be more elaborate. The deadline for submission is Nov. 30. and should be sent to Jane Hyatt at 506 Columbia Ave. Call 425-6182 to leave a message for more information.

  • TODAYHOY
    • Story Time will be at 10:30 a.m. and 3:30 p.m. Wednesday, Oct. 20, in the children’s area at Carnegie Public Library. The theme will be “Halloween Countdown.”  The book will be “What a Scare, Jesse Bear” by Nancy White Carlstrom. The craft will be a jack-o-lantern windsock.

  • West Las Vegas Middle School Principal Steve Sandoval said kids in the Builders Club try to build a lot of goodwill in the community by doing good works.

    “Students are actively involved in community service and service to their school,” Sandoval said.

    Sponsor Sandra Coca said serving the community is at the heart of the the Builders Club pledge.

    “To better my school, my community, my nation and myself; to aid those in need while enhancing leadership capabilities; and to encourage the fellowship of all mankind,” the pledge reads.

  • Sapello-Rociada Fire Chief Kayt Peck says she believes she is the first woman to hold that title in San Miguel County.

    She said she has checked records and could find no indications that other women have served in that role in the county.

    Peck learned her firefighting skills at one of the U.S. Navy’s renowned firefighting training school. After the disastrous fire aboard the USS Forestall during the Vietnam War, sailors received extensive training in putting out all types of fires.

  • The legendary East-West Las Vegas division debate virtually fades in the light of at least one nexus which unites members of the Roman Catholic community on both sides of the Gallinas — and beyond.

    Father George Salazar and Father C. John Brasher, pastors of Immaculate Conception and Our Lady of Sorrows parishes, respectively, agree on a key concept, “One town, one family.” And so it is.

  • Gabriel Garcia has a passion for art that has lived in him since he was a young child. Now he wants to help others by expressing themselves through art.

    Garcia, the youngest child of Ralph and Frances Garcia of Las Vegas, is a humble and gentle soul who expresses his inner emotions and imagination on everything he creates. His life has always been filled with some form of art — drawing, crafts and music.

  • Briana Montaño wants to become the 2011 valedictorian at West Las Vegas High School.

    That would be keeping the honor in the family. The 2010 valedictorian was her sister, Krystle Montaño.

    Principal Gene Parson said Montaño is competitive in academics and is a five-sport letterman, but always competes in a very respectful manner.        

  • Beatrice Maestas-Sandoval and George Ulibarri are master artists in their own right — judging from the array of artifacts tastefully arranged in George’s home and from the works in progress in the adjacent workshop area the two share.

    Beatrice remarks that some of her work is on display at her brother Jose Maestas’ business on Sixth Street.

  • Maggie Romigh is not only a mentor, but a mentor of mentors.

    She has sacrificed financially to work as a community coordinator for Big Brothers Big Sisters of Northern New Mexico, but said she has been rewarded in countless other ways.

    “When I first came to New Mexico, one of the choices I made was that I was going to do what was important to me, rather than focus on making money,” Romigh said.

  • Judy Cordova-Romero had big dreams when she first came to Highlands University, and many of her dreams to make campus life better for students came true during her tenure.

    As Highlands University vice president for student affairs, Cordova-Romero was an advocate for the new residence hall that students enjoy today. She pushed for a new student center that had its groundbreaking ceremony Monday. And her dreams of refurbishing the Felix Martinez building into a one-stop shop for students’ needs came true during a ribbon-cutting ceremony this week.

  • What would it take to lure renowned musicians into one’s home? What if they were Arturo Toscaninni, considered by many as the greatest conductor ever to wave a baton, or George and Ira Gershwin, renowned lyricist and pianist and the beloved clarinet player, Benny Goodman?

    Luring wasn’t necessary; in the East 90th Street New York City home of Albert Fredric Stoessel, an American composer, violinist and conductor; these visits were customary. Stoessel’s son, Las Vegas resident, Fredrick Stoessel says, “I just thought of them as family friends.”