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Features

  • CARAMEL PEANUT THUMBPRINTS

    Start to finish: 1 hour
    Servings: 4 dozen

    1 cup (2 sticks) unsalted butter, room temperature
    1/2 cup granulated sugar
    1/3 cup packed brown sugar
    1/4 teaspoon kosher salt
    1 teaspoon vanilla extract
    1 egg
    2 ounces unsweetened chocolate, melted
    2 cups all-purpose flour
    2 cups chopped salted peanuts
    48 cream center caramel candies (such as Caramel Creams)

    Heat the oven to 350 F.

  • From StatePoint

    Thanksgiving can mean too many cooks in the kitchen, so consider taking some prep outside. While grilling is usually associated with summer, more Americans are recognizing its year-round potential.

    In fact, 80 percent of North American households own a grill or smoker and 60 percent use it year-round, according to recent statistics from the Hearth, Patio & Barbecue Association. It’s no surprise that many Thanksgiving recipes can be reinvented outdoors.

  • By Dorie Greespan
    The Associated Press

    Around the world, it’s time for holiday cookies: German springerles rolled out with patterned rolling pins; Dutch speculoos as tall as St. Nick and as intricately detailed as a stained glass window; internationally beloved gingerbread men, women, children and pets; and, of course, the icon of American holiday baking, the butter cookie, a cookie so satisfying we crave it all year long.

  • By Melissa D’Arabian
    The Associated Press

    When I was 5, my mom invited a bunch of my kindergarten girlfriends and their moms over for cookies, cocoa and caroling to celebrate the holidays. That tradition turned into an annual holiday ritual, and I grew up equating the holiday season with massive amounts of baking, particularly cookies.

  • Submitted to the Optic

    ALBUQUERQUE — If you were, or know, a New Mexico Air National Guardsman stationed in Tuy Hoa, Vietnam, in 1968, Art Sena is looking for you. The reason goes back to a long-ago wish to make Christmas merrier for service personnel at war, and a long-lost box of film.

  • By Margaret McKinney
    Highlands University

    Highlands University English professor Donna Woodford-Gormley was awarded a National Endowment for the Humanities summer stipend to complete her book that explores Cuban cultural adaptations of Shakespeare.

    Woodford-Gormley is the only Shakespeare scholar conducting research in Cuba.

  • By Margaret McKinney
    Highlands University

    The New Mexico Highlands University Music Technology Program presents an Original Music Concert at 7 p.m. Friday in Ilfeld Auditorium.

    The styles of music featured are as varied as the students themselves, including rock, alternative, folk, hip-hop, singer-songwriter, and more.

    Department of Music professor Edward Harrington directs the Music Technology Program, and the concert.

  • By Jon Blau
    The Herald-Times

    BLOOMINGTON, Ind.  — From the drawers of Dr. Helen Fisher’s New York City apartment to seven white boxes at Indiana University’s Kinsey Institute, the personal effects of one of the world’s most interviewed sex experts outline her career with magazine stacks, VHS tapes and audio cassettes without their cases.

  • The Associated Press

    CLARKSBURG, W.Va. — Whenever Valentine’s Day falls on a weekday, a Harrison County, West Virginia, judge presides over happy couples instead of defendants and plaintiffs.

    Circuit Court Judge Thomas A. Bedell holds a group wedding ceremony on Feb. 14 for couples who want to participate. This year’s noon ceremony will mark the 12th time he has held the event.

    “Part of the fun is just to see who shows up at 12 o’clock on Feb. 14,” Bedell told The Exponent Telegram.

  • By Leanne Italie
    The Associated Press

    NEW YORK — The way Tom & Lorenzo see it, you’ve got lots of choices come Valentine’s Day.
    How about having some fun playing rich and famous, or you could stay true to yourself, whether that means handing over carnations instead of Cartier.

  • By Leanne Italie
    The Associated Press

    NEW YORK — The way Tom & Lorenzo see it, you’ve got lots of choices come Valentine’s Day.
    How about having some fun playing rich and famous, or you could stay true to yourself, whether that means handing over carnations instead of Cartier.

  • Highlands University

    Originally a teachers college, Highlands University has evolved into a multifaceted institution of higher learning, a reflection of its own multi-cultural heritage. For alumni the real university, and the true story of Highlands was their experience in the classroom with faculty who inspired, nurtured and instilled the sense of curiosity critical to learning and living.

  • The first president of New Mexico Normal School was an Illinois farmer’s son whose love of learning led him far beyond the one-room schools where he started his education.

    Edgar Lee Hewett, born in 1865, attended local rural schools and graduated at the top of his class.

    He took a county teachers’ examination and qualified for a certificate with near perfect scores.

  • Highlands University

    It’s the quiet ones. Quietly raising money for scholarships that not only change individual students’ lives, but that of their families for generations to come.

    Carefully, thoughtfully, and conservatively investing monies to accumulate wealth in order to support the students and the university with special programs and projects.

    Seeking, shepherding and guiding donors who wish to leave a legacy so that future generations of New Mexico Highlands Students can obtain scholarships, grants and awards.

  • 1891
    29th New Mexico Legislative Assembly enacts the Public School Law of 1891, creating the territory’s first comprehensive public school system.

    Feb. 11, 1893
    Public School Law signed by Territorial Gov. L. Branford Prince, creating normal schools in Las Vegas and Silver City.

    Oct. 4, 1897
    Edgar Lee Hewett hired as the first president of the New Mexico Normal School in Las Vegas (which would later become New Mexico Highlands University); Hewett’s first day on the job was July 1, 1898.

  • The nickname “Cowboys” was adopted by the New Mexico Normal University faculty athletic committee and student council as the official name of the athletic teams in February 1930.

    Before then, the school used the name “Tigers.” Through the efforts of alumnus S. Omar Barker, the name was changed.

    Barker, a distinguished Western writer who lived in Las Vegas, asked, “Cannot the University contrive to discover some team name that would have the pungency of local and Southwestern significance, some name that would be unique?