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Today's Opinions

  • Editorial Thumbs

    Thumbs UP for ... LOUD AND CLEAR. Members of the Mora-San Miguel Electric Co-op rejected nearly all of the 18 proposed changes to its organizational bylaws last weekend, and we want to applaud the membership for one big decision in particular. Requiring the utility to follow the state’s open meetings and open records laws is critical for the co-op’s credibility.

  • Letter: The impact on property values

    Industrial wind developers like to dismiss local community residents as NIMBYs (not in my back yard), when they object to development within a few hundred feet of their homes.

  • Editorial: Where is West's anger?

    Should our government have a zero-tolerance approach toward drunken driving? Of course it should. Unfortunately, the West Las Vegas school district has fallen short.

    Last year, the district’s head mechanic totaled a West vehicle in Moriarty. The Torrance County Sheriff’s Department said the West employee and a friend, another local mechanic, had gone to a bar and a strip club beforehand. Both went to the hospital after the crash.

  • Work of Art: Nothing never happens

    Two things have happened recently to make me really ponder the ways in which people communicate — or sometimes don’t.

    When people say, “We’re just not communicating,” I want to say, “Yes we are, but we’re just not agreeing.” In other words, “Nothing never happens.”

    At the risk of violating the double-negative rule (nothing, never), I’m merely saying there always is communication, but not always what we desire.

  • Editorial: Tackling the big issues

    If the Las Vegas City Council does its job, it faces uncomfortable issues. In so doing, its members may not always win popularity contests.

    At its regular meeting last week, the council voted to take the first step toward an ordinance that will raise the local sales tax by 25 cents for every $100 in purchases.

  • Letter: Shaking up Mora County

    “Mora County had the equivalent of a political earthquake,” said David Giuliani in the June 7 Optic.

    Two Mora County Commission seats were taken by John Olivas and Paula Garcia during the primary election June 1. Uncontested for the November ballot and new to political life, Olivas begins his four-year term as the District 2 commissioner this coming January, while Garcia will run against Republican opponent, Antonio Pino in District 1.  But with 61 percent of the primary vote, her win in November should be for certain.  

  • As It Is: Political decisions

    Every sheriff in New Mexico gets to pick his own undersheriff. It’s a political appointment, so the undersheriff doesn’t have much job protection.

    If the under-sheriff looks at the boss in the wrong way, then the sheriff can get rid of him.

    In March, when Mora County Undersheriff Tim Marquez decided to run for sheriff against his boss, Roy Cordova, the sheriff quickly fired him.

    At the time, I thought that seemed acceptable — that’s just the way it works.

    Now, I’m wondering whether it should work that way.

  • Letter: Changes should be tough to make

    Regarding MSMEC Proposed Bylaw Change No. 16: The reason for requiring super majority votes when changing charters, bylaws, etc. is to deliberately make it difficult. If the location of the co-op headquarters can be changed with a simple majority vote, we could potentially be changing locations every other year.