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Today's Opinions

  • Correction

    In last Friday’s Optic, the wrong “signature” followed the letter headlined “Guantanamo and its legacy.”

    Judy Bennett of Rociada, not Judy Smith, wrote the letter.

  • Nuestra Historia - New Mexico becomes a territory

    After 1846, New Mexico was under absolute U.S. military rule for almost five years. A limited civil government was appointed by whatever U.S. Army commander was in charge, following the departure of Gen. Stephen Watts Kearny. (After his invasion in Aug. 1846, Kearny stayed in New Mexico only 40 days, continuing his march west to occupy California, where he declared himself military governor in March 1847.)

  • Editorial Roundup - Excerpts from editorials around the nation

    The Daily Sentinel, Grand Junction, Colo., on tracking suspects with GPS technology (Jan. 23) — The U.S. Supreme Court demonstrated that the U.S. Constitution is flexible enough to handle 21st century, high-tech issues, but it is solid enough to protect citizens’ rights even when dealing with such issues.

    And by the way, the court did so unanimously.

    The court ruled that police must obtain a search warrant before using Global Positioning System technology to track a criminal suspect.

  • City made a bad call

    It’s laudable that the city is willing to give a second chance to people who have gotten into trouble with the law. We all make mistakes, and we all deserve a chance at redemption.

    State law doesn’t allow the city to implement an all-out ban on the hiring of felons, and that’s a good thing. As City Manager Timothy Dodge points out, if you take away a person’s ability to make a living, what’s left but for that person to revert to crime?

  • Editorial Cartoon - Jan. 25, 2012
  • Work of Art - When status mattered

    Remember when status in school meant something? Remember when the more popular kids thought of themselves as royalty?

    As a senior today, four times older than when I was the other kind of senior, I look back and wonder why popularity, or lack thereof, mattered.

    Let me explain:

  • Unusual cooperation

    Just when you think the rifts between Democrats and Republicans are too great for anything good to happen, here comes a bipartisan plan to revamp the New Mexico Senate district boundaries. District Judge James Hall approved the compromise plan last week, which had the support of Gov. Susana Martinez, some other Republicans, a group of Democrats and Native Americans.

  • Editor's Note - A love story

    Heather Glidewell McDonald’s life is a love story. One big part of her story is that she fell for her Rogers, Ark., high school sweetheart, Don McDonald. They separated to attend different colleges, but that didn’t last long and, in 1975, they graduated from Hendrix College in Conway, together — a year after they got married. They remained husband and wife for 37-1/2 years.

    From the beginning, Heather was surrounded by the love of family.