Today's Opinions

  • Editorial Cartoon - July 5, 2013
  • Work of Art: Language interference? No way

    This isn’t going to be a discourse on the “English Only” movement, which is gaining momentum in many areas. Expressing my opinions on the monolingual approach would take far more time and space than is available here.
    But I once fell victim to a virulent e-mail forwarder from Deming. She sent to everyone in her address book a treatise by a congressman whose take on learning any language but English seemed — at least to me — bigoted. The politico’s dictum was: English is what is spoken in the U.S.; if you don’t like it, leave.

  • Columnist had wrong house

    Regarding the column I wrote about my grandparents, Hilario and Silvianita Delgado, living at the Montgomery Bell Mansion, my cousin Tony Ulibarri says this was not their house. He would know since he lived there with his mother and is ten years older then me.

  • Equal rights for all

    The U.S. Supreme Court made history last week with a pair of decisions on same-sex marriage that left gay rights advocates celebrating.

  • Another Perspective - Growing up in the Bell mansion

    In the June 7 Optic, Jesus Lopez wrote about Nuestra Historia, Part 1, and included a photo of a house built by a former slave named Montgomery Bell, who left Missouri and came to Las Vegas in 1867.
    Mr. Bell built a 10-room mansion that was located where Hot Springs Boulevard intersects with Bernalillo Street. Thanks to Mr. Lopez’s historical contributions, I immediately recognized the house where my grandparents lived. I have no doubt that many people in Las Vegas remember this house.

  • Editorial Cartoon - July 1, 2013
  • Editorial Cartoon - June 28, 2013
  • Thumbs Our high country lowdown on the news - June 28, 2013

    The latest Kids Count survey has found that New Mexico, for the first time, has slipped to worst in the nation when it comes to child well-being. According to the survey, more than 30 percent of children in New Mexico were living in poverty in 2011 and nearly two-fifths had parents who lacked secure employment. The results of that report are sobering. Rather than pointing fingers at one another and trying to assign blame, we all need to roll up our sleeves and get to work on improving the situation for our kids. We owe them that much.