Today's Opinions

  • Publisher's Note: Poverty and hopelessness

    The numbers that came out of a recent U.S. Census report are alarming. If well-off Americans don’t heed the warning signs, they could indeed be facing a serious backlash.

  • Don’t blame the dittoheads

    The following is a response to your column on Aug. 29, “Facts and opinions.”

    I am a “dittohead.” Yes! I listen to Rush Limbaugh! But you got it wrong. Dittoheads are not robots. Dittohead no longer believe the spin and distortions from omission of facts that Mainstream Media perpetuate.

  • Thumbs - Our high country lowdown on the news

    THUMBS DOWN! RADIO THREATS. Let this be a lesson for all who get their hands on a radio used by emergency personnel — don’t mess around with it. The Federal Communications Commissions has announced that it intends to impose a $25,000 fine against a local man who got hold of a police radio and used it in an inappropriate way.

  • Editorial Cartoons - Sept. 16, 2011
  • Editorial Cartoons - Sept. 16, 2011
  • Lawmaker's Perspective: Redistricting the main focus

    The legislature is meeting in special session to consider redistricting legislation and a slew of other issues that the governor has placed on the agenda. The difficulty is that communication between the governor and the legislature has been very limited leading up to this session, foreshadowing a contentious few weeks.

    New Mexico now more than ever needs the governor and the legislature to communicate, cooperate and collaborate.

  • Nuestra Historia - Montezuma’s seminary in exile

    The U.S. Catholic Conference of Bishops purchased the Montezuma property in 1937, and a Catholic seminary was established at the site for the education and religious training of Mexican seminarians, under the direction of a Mexican order of Jesuit priests.

    It is common knowledge that for many years Montezuma served as a Catholic seminary, but seldom do historical or other accounts explain why a Mexican seminary came to be located in the United States, five miles north of Las Vegas. We will provide that explanation in this column.

  • Nuestra Historia a memorable read

    I am writing to let you know how much we enjoy and appreciate reading “Nuestra Historia” in the Las Vegas Optic. In the early 1950s, about 100 families from Las Vegas, N.M., came to Las Vegas, Nev., to work in the early stages of the atomic testings in Nevada.

    Most of us are in our 60s, 70s and 80s. We all enjoy reading the Optic.

    I lived in Old Town 1932-1941 on Rincon Street. In 1941, we moved to New Town on Eighth Street to a neighborhood called La Placita de Los Maestas. I had the honor of attending Castle School.