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Today's Opinions

  • Long-term survival vs. short-term gain

    In recent months, much has appeared in the Optic about climate change and about hydraulic fracturing (fracking) to obtain natural gas, but only Andrew Gold (Feb. 22) has suggested that a connection exists between these two phenomena.

  • Lunch ruined by traffic stop

    While returning from lunch with a friend, he chose to steer safely around two large potholes in front of the Mills plaza and didn’t notice a police cruiser, some distance behind us. At the light, my friend waved at the two officers, who had pulled alongside.

    A siren blurt cued my friend to pull out of the officers’ way, but to our chagrin, they pulled us over. The officers were polite with immaculate uniforms, but they soon lost my respect.

  • A job well done by commissioners

    Item 10 on the Agenda at last Tuesday’s regular Commissioners meeting, was a vote on whether to extend the moratorium against drilling (fracking) in San Miguel County for another eight months.

    This was the culmination of months of public forums and hearings, gathering thousands of signatures on petitions and “public input” at Commission meetings addressing the debate between the economic “blessings” vs. the certain risk to our most precious resources: our water and the air we breathe.

  • Nuestra Historia - The two-hour break that saved Highlands

    On Monday, Feb. 6, 1893, Highlands University was born, only because John DeWitt Veeder and Felix Martinez were able to outmaneuver those who would have established only one normal school for the Territory, in Silver City, or none at all. It was a momentous day for Las Vegas, which would be forever transformed as the home of one of New Mexico’s early institutions of higher education.

  • Nuestra Historia - The two-hour break that saved Highlands

    On Monday, Feb. 6, 1893, Highlands University was born, only because John DeWitt Veeder and Felix Martinez were able to outmaneuver those who would have established only one normal school for the Territory, in Silver City, or none at all. It was a momentous day for Las Vegas, which would be forever transformed as the home of one of New Mexico’s early institutions of higher education.

  • Our Watershed - Mother Nature’s water system

    Editor’s note: This is the fourth in a series running over several consecutive Fridays. It is written by members of the Hermit’s Peak Watershed Alliance, which seeks to foster land stewardship in the Gallinas, Sapello and Tecolote watersheds.

    The city of Las Vegas and its residents depend on water in the Gallinas River for more than 90 percent of its municipal needs. Storrie Lake Water Users Association receives almost all its water from the Gallinas River. That’s a serious dependency.

  • Free enterprise prevails

    It’s getting to where Washington D.C.’s manufactured crises are becoming so commonplace that they’re barely cause for concern anymore. Witness the so-called sequester, which began March 1 to a whole lot of media noise while the general public slept through it.

    Despite President Obama’s cries of wolf — calling the sequester a disaster, though that simply didn’t happen — the U.S. economy chugged along en route to a bona fide recovery for reasons having nothing to do with a dysfunctional U.S. government.

  • Editorial Cartoon - March 20, 2013