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Today's Opinions

  • Optic promoting oil/gas industry

    The Friday, Aug. 17, headline should have read, “Optic Touts Oil and Gas Industry.”

    Devoting a large front page headline, a photograph and 27 column inches to what a bought bureaucrat says and one sentence supposedly to what area environmental activists say (although quoting no one) is not reporting. It’s promotion. It’s not journalism — it’s blatant public relations for the oil and gas industry.

  • So-called ‘free lunch’ just isn’t so

    In the article “Oil and Gas Industry Touted,” Mr. Barela promotes the industry as if there is only one side of the equation: the income side. However, there are real and tangible costs to the county and its taxpayers for such development.

    A study of three small communities in Wyoming — which is seeing unprecedented oil and gas development — found that two of the communities broke even, while the third actually suffered a net loss.

  • Stop with all the increases

  • AI sends off more cards, letters

    One hundred post cards and letters have just been sent from Las Vegas to people in Colombia, China and Israel. All the cards had been written by people attending the People’s Faire who were moved to send messages of support and solidarity to Juan David Diaz Chamorro, Shi Tao and Ahmad Qatamesh.

  • Nuestra Historia - A tale of two cities

    As in the Dickens classic, it was the best of times, it was the worst of times, as East and West Las Vegas grew along the Gallinas River after the railroad arrived in 1879.

    For almost a century — except for a permutation from 1882 to 1884 — the twin cities existed as separate and independent municipalities, each with its own mayor, council, administration, police and fire departments. Though separated only by a modest river, their evolution would be strikingly dissimilar, always accentuated by a stark racial divide which set the two towns apart.

  • Nuestra Historia - A tale of two cities

    As in the Dickens classic, it was the best of times, it was the worst of times, as East and West Las Vegas grew along the Gallinas River after the railroad arrived in 1879.

    For almost a century — except for a permutation from 1882 to 1884 — the twin cities existed as separate and independent municipalities, each with its own mayor, council, administration, police and fire departments. Though separated only by a modest river, their evolution would be strikingly dissimilar, always accentuated by a stark racial divide which set the two towns apart.

  • Another Perspective - City, acequias still wrestling over water rights

    Historically, there has been a thriving agricultural community in and around Las Vegas, based on the acequias — which can be understood as both physical structures to deliver water and communities of people with a proud tradition.

    In the 1950s, the New Mexico Supreme Court gave the City of Las Vegas the right to take as much water as it needed from the Gallinas River under the so-called Pueblo Water Rights Doctrine. Using this decision, the city gradually increased the amount of water it diverted from the river until it was sometimes taking all the water available.

  • A wedge issue?

    It’s been mentioned though not emphasized, but a recent West Las Vegas School Board meeting suggests that it’s already creating some friction between the Meadow City’s two school districts. We’re talking about the east side’s new four-day school week, and how it’s going to go over on the west side.