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Today's Opinions

  • Mora committing economic suicide

    Will the last Mora County Resident to leave please turn out the lights.

    Just about the time we think things cannot get any worse for our zero growth, high unemployment neighbors to the north, it does, get worse that is. The body of county folks in charge must have several closets of shoes with holes in them from the ready, fire, aim approach for which they are so famous. If it is not the county complex fiasco it is the anti-fracking ordinance.

  • County officials to be applauded

    Because the U.S. Supreme Court says “Corporations are people and money is speech” does not make it so.

    By your reasoning orders from on high are sacrosanct, thus German soldiers were absolved of any guilt for “following orders” during the second World War, even when those orders were illegal.    

  • Nuestra Historia: Optic has seen 10 owners since 1879

    In its 134-year history, the Optic has changed ownership 10 times, though three of those owners held the newspaper for less than two years. After Hub Kane died of a sudden heart attack in 1947, the Optic was run by a board of trustees headed by attorney Louis C. Ilfeld (Charles Ilfeld’s son), and included Kane’s widow, Helen Kelly Kane. The trustees and Mrs. Kane ran the paper for a brief period, but less than a year after Hub Kane’s death, the Optic was sold to Orville E. Priestly.

  • Oil and Gas Issues - Impacts on emergency response, roads

    Editor’s note: This is the fifth in a series of articles addressing issues associated with oil and gas development in San Miguel County. The articles were written by participants in PROTECT San Miguel county, a local all-volunteer grass-roots organization. The group has been working with the county’s oil and gas task force for three years, has toured several existing oil and gas producing facilities, and has been collecting extensive research on the issues. More information is at http://PROTECTsmc.org

  • Seeing the dividends

    Most lawns around town are either yellow, or else the grass is completely gone. Our dreary yards are a testament to the severe drought this area has suffered over the last several years.

    The city has been in Stage IV water restrictions for more than two years, meaning that use of potable water to irrigate lawns and outdoor plants is prohibited. Those restrictions have paid off. According to the city, we currently use 1.4 million gallons of water a day, about a million gallons less than we were using in 2011.

  • Editorial Cartoon - May 15, 2013
  • Work of Art — Who’s responsible for alphabet?

    Thumbing through the pages of a website called The Straight Dope, I came across a question that is totally relevant during May, the month of graduations.

    Someone on the website asked, “Why is the alphabet in alphabetical order?” The reader adds, “Who decided A was the first letter, B was the second, and so on?”

  • Golden parachutes

    The recent Associated Press story outlining the generous pensions that state lawmakers receive once they are out of office raises some serious questions.

    Among the troubling issues raised by the article is that while lawmakers have trimmed pension benefits for some government workers they have resisted scaling back their own pension program.

    Just how egregious is the situation?