Today's Opinions

  • Health care basic, essential

  • Rich don’t pay their fair share

    I have rarely read such a comprehensive justification of trickle-down economics as that provided by Janet Schwandt (letter to the editor, Oct. 3). The theory was given the more palatable but less comprehensible name of “supply-side economics” and embraced as public policy during the Reagan years, and thrives to this day.

  • Mil Gracias

    Las Vegas National Wildlife Refuge recently hosted the seventh annual Concert for the Birds, a wonderful concert, and the Kids Fun in Nature Day event featuring Mariachi Cardenal Infantil. The great service to our visitors could not have been provided without the extensive contribution by many.

  • The east-side school tax

    Last week’s report on this year’s property tax assessments is a great big mixture of good news and bad news, especially for the east side of Las Vegas.

  • Editorial Cartoon - Oct. 12, 2011
  • Work of Art: We mustn’t exaggerate

    My mommy told me a hundred million times not to exaggerate. But I continue to do so. When something is outrageously expressed, we can always say, “Well, you ought to know I was exaggerating, deliberately.”
    For example, when we say, “We’ve been waiting for hours for Amtrak to arrive ...“ (Well, that would be accurate.) Let’s say instead, “We’ve been waiting for hours for the Rail Runner.” That’s an exaggeration.

  • Recycling opportunity

    It’s unfortunate that all it takes is a few people to create a blight upon our community. Most citizens don’t litter, but the few who do create eyesores for everyone else.
    Fortunately, however, the opposite is also true. A relative handful of people can make the entire community look better — and in more ways than one. We venture to say that most Las Vegas residents don’t recycle,  but among those who do are some dedicated individuals working to make the task easier for everyone.

  • A look at fracking

    If Michael Moore had made Gasland, it  would have been wittier. Maybe Josh Fox, who produced the documentary after a natural gas company offered to lease his Pennsylvania land for drilling, was just too close to the story. To him, the threat of hydraulic fracturing, or fracking, coming to his homeland and polluting his water and air was a personal affront.