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Today's Opinions

  • The amendments comparison

    Regarding (Tom McDonald’s) “Free Speech and Gun Rights” (column): A couple of comments on your comparison of the First Amendment to the Second Amendment:

    The “limitations” you mention on free speech (falsely yelling “fire” in a crowded theater and defamation) both are declarations of the fact that the First Amendment does not protect false statements. These limitations are not what we might call substantive.

  • Thumbs: Our high country lowdown on the news - Jan. 18, 2013

    THUMBS UP! AND THEY’RE OFF. Consider this thumb the result of cautious optimism that the legislative session, which started this week, will be a productive one, with the governor keeping a tight grip on spending while lawmakers make good decisions that benefit New Mexicans. With Congress as an example of how not to govern, we’re hoping to see the betterment of the state trumping partisan politics —but that will be up to the players in Santa Fe.

  • Editorial Cartoon - Jan. 18, 2013
  • Editorial Cartoon - Jan. 18, 2013
  • Nuestra Historia - A tale of two cities, thus far

    Our present series, “A Tale of Two Cities,” began in August 2012, and tells the uniquely fascinating story of how East and West Las Vegas existed side by side for almost a century, as separate and independent municipalities. As we explained early on, though separated only by a modest river, the evolution of the two cities was strikingly dissimilar, always accentuated by a stark racial divide.

  • Meeting raises questions of scope

    On Jan. 10 I attended the public input meeting at the County Commission regarding gas and oil drilling in San Miguel County. I left with the feeling that we’re not getting all the information about the actual scope of the situation.

  • Still waiting on credible evidence

    No comprende. Recent letters to the editor by Diana Presser and Jesus Rivas, again demonstrate there is little evidence that fracking is a big problem, yet there are so many good people who believe it is. I’m still waiting to see the unbiased, credible sources that warrants their concerns.

  • Where’s the water coming from?

    That is a question that County Commissioner Ron Ortega asked proponents of hydraulic fracturing or “fracking” time and again at last Thursday’s hearing on fracking. Some of them suggested the industry would truck in the necessary water. Another one said that the market would take care of it, supply and demand.

    A Halliburton whitepaper on reducing water cost during fracking states: “Typical drilling and completion operations use approximately 4 million gallons of water (or 1,000 truckloads).”