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Today's Opinions

  • ‘Moving forward’ for whom?

    First let me congratulate Mayor Alfonso Ortiz and councilors Joey Herrera and Vince Howell. These three elected officials are truly by and for the people. Las Vegas is finally in tune with the rest of the country that is moving forward and no matter what we the citizens have to say.

  • Troubled tenure

    Thomas Garcia’s resignation as superintendent of the Mora Independent School District is, to say the least, timely.

  • Editorial Cartoon - Oct. 8, 2012
  • Water necessitates fracking ban

    The Weather report on Channel 7 for Saturday, Sept. 15, had the following information: “More than half of New Mexico is in severe drought or worse.”

  • Editor's Note - Defining the center

    Here’s my take on the political center, which is a mighty important place to be this year, since a relative handful of independent moderates are going to decide the presidential election.

    You’re in the center if:
    • You believe in government, under restraints. You think government should be smaller in its size and scope, but it should also be big enough to look out for and respond to citizens’ needs. You realize that government is sometimes part of the problem, but you also know it’s the solution from time to time.

  • Thumbs - Our high country lowdown on the news - Oct. 5, 2012

    THUMBS UP! HONOR FOR AN HONORABLE MAN. We hope former coach and Las Vegas mayor Henry Sanchez, who died last November at age 72, is smiling down right down. Highlands University has named the basketball floor in the Wilson Complex in his honor. Sanchez had a storied career as a New Mexico high school and college basketball coach, including as coach of the Highlands men’s team en route to a 702-450 won-loss career record.
    The lives he touched were immeasurable. We’re glad to see Highlands bestowing this honor on him.

  • Editorial Cartoon - Oct. 5, 2012


     

  • Nuestra Historia - Early schools prospered in East Las Vegas

    Education is dominantly interwoven in the tale of two cities, from their earliest days. Just as Catholics had done in Old Town beginning in the 1860s, Protestants established New Town’s first school, the Las Vegas Academy, built in 1880 at the southeast corner of Douglas Avenue and 12th Street. By 1886, the impressive two-story brick school had an enrollment of 121 boys and 10 girls, and seven teachers provided instruction.