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Today's Opinions

  • Editorial Cartoons - Nov. 21, 2012
  • Work of Art - Ultima, ultimately

    The first time many of us saw Rudolfo Anaya was when he spoke to Highlands students and staff in a packed Sala de Madrid, around 1972.

    He had just completed his first — and in my opinion, his best — novel, “Bless Me, Ultima,” now a movie that my family and I saw at a multi-screen theater in Santa Fe last weekend.

  • Concede vote and negotiate

    Finally, a ruling in Alta Vista Regional Hospital’s legal challenge to a 121-73 vote held five years ago in favor of a union for hospital employees — and the U.S. Court of Appeals decision is about as damning as they come.

    Just read this verbiage in the ruling in reference to “a blizzard of arguments” challenging the vote supervised by the National Labor Relations Board.

  • Editorial Cartoon - Nov. 19, 2012
  • Editor's Note - Home and family

    Eight years.

    That’s how long I’ve lived in Las Vegas. Long enough to have become familiar with the community and its people, but not nearly long enough to become anything other than an outsider, at least to some people.

    I guess I don’t mind. I was born and raised in Arkansas, and yet I’ve always felt sort of different there too.

    Unless I’m with my family. There, I belong.

  • Mil Gracias - Nov. 19, 2012

    Mike “Mateo” Sena Elementary School recently held its annual Fall Fest. As in years past, it was a great success.  

  • Thumbs: Our high country lowdown on the news - Nov. 16, 2012

    THUMBS UP! INTERNATIONAL DISPLAY. United World College isn’t the only place where you can find international diversity in the Las Vegas area. Take a look at Highlands University and last week’s Gathering of Nationalities event and you’ll see plenty of it.
    What a tremendous advantage our community has, to be able to count among us so many people from so many nations and cultures. Such diversity is an advantage — and something well worth celebrating.

  • Filibuster rules need reforms

    In the past, Senate members used a filibuster as a means of bringing attention to a high-profile bill they disagreed with.  For many, many years it was seldom employed but since the 1970s it has been used repeatedly to stop much of the chamber’s work. Both parties have used the filibuster to alter simple “majority rules” bills to supermajority votes, so this is not a partisan issue.