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Letters

  • On eve of elections, thoughts on education

    … I once did a study on how teamwork affects children, and I recall a little example I found in a science book. Science has discovered about why geese flying south along a river fly along in a “V” formation. As each bird flaps its wings it creates uplift for the bird immediately following. By flying in a “V” formation the whole flock adds at least 71 percent better flying range than if a bird flew on its own.

  • Insulted by editorial cartoon

    I’m very displeased and insulted on the inaccuracy of that editorial cartoon published in the LV Optic on Jan. 18. First and foremost, my heart goes out to the people who lost their lives in the Connecticut slaughter and other victims of violence done by the very few mentally unstable people. One person dead, is way too many people dead.   

  • Balanced approach ‘won the day’

    Balanced approach ‘won the day’

    We would like to commend the San Miguel County Commission for the public hearing it held Jan. 10 on the proposed oil and gas ordinance. For the first time, all sides participated in the debate.

  • Letter writers raise good points

    This letter is intended to address two letters to the editor in the Optic on Jan. 18. I would like to praise Kim Reed-Deemer for her legitimate concerns regarding critical questions of regulations and enforcement having to do with gas and oil drilling in San Miguel County. I agree with her doubts about adequate environmental protections under the current state of affairs. In the long run, I wonder if the monetary gain to San Miguel County would be worth it to our youth and the wellbeing of every resident.

  • Cherry-picking energy facts

    When I call home (Las Vegas) and chat with my mom, it’s always great to go through the rundown of headlines in Vegas. It’s often the case that I know many of the issues already because I read through the “Optic” online and I chat with friends on Facebook regularly.

    But my conversations with my mom allow me to see the community through her eyes.

    When she raises an issue in the course of our conversations, I know it’s something lots of other people are also talking about.

  • Dispelling a citizenship rumor

    I am writing to correct a misapprehension currently being floated around Mora concerning my citizenship. Certain parties, trying to prejudice my candidacy for school board, are claiming that I am not a U.S. citizen.  

    I was born in San Francisco, as was my father. He was an MIT physicist who worked for the AEC, including frequent visits to New Mexico at White Sands. My American father and English mother were married in Honolulu where his father, a bird colonel in the U.S. Army, was stationed at the time.

  • The amendments comparison

    Regarding (Tom McDonald’s) “Free Speech and Gun Rights” (column): A couple of comments on your comparison of the First Amendment to the Second Amendment:

    The “limitations” you mention on free speech (falsely yelling “fire” in a crowded theater and defamation) both are declarations of the fact that the First Amendment does not protect false statements. These limitations are not what we might call substantive.

  • Meeting raises questions of scope

    On Jan. 10 I attended the public input meeting at the County Commission regarding gas and oil drilling in San Miguel County. I left with the feeling that we’re not getting all the information about the actual scope of the situation.

  • Still waiting on credible evidence

    No comprende. Recent letters to the editor by Diana Presser and Jesus Rivas, again demonstrate there is little evidence that fracking is a big problem, yet there are so many good people who believe it is. I’m still waiting to see the unbiased, credible sources that warrants their concerns.

  • Where’s the water coming from?

    That is a question that County Commissioner Ron Ortega asked proponents of hydraulic fracturing or “fracking” time and again at last Thursday’s hearing on fracking. Some of them suggested the industry would truck in the necessary water. Another one said that the market would take care of it, supply and demand.

    A Halliburton whitepaper on reducing water cost during fracking states: “Typical drilling and completion operations use approximately 4 million gallons of water (or 1,000 truckloads).”