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Letters

  • Four down, two to go

    When we completed the last mural panel for the “The Peoples History of El Norte,” none of the contemporary issues illustrated were resolved. Since then four of six have been resolved by a concerted grassroots effort by the people of San Miguel County.

    Whites Peak has been returned to the people, Invenergy has been blocked from littering the Bernal mesa with turbines, the PNM plant on the west side of Las Vegas has been shut down, and the 1199 have finally prevailed against Alta Vista Regional Hospital.

  • Mil Gracias - Nov. 19, 2012

    Mike “Mateo” Sena Elementary School recently held its annual Fall Fest. As in years past, it was a great success.  

  • Filibuster rules need reforms

    In the past, Senate members used a filibuster as a means of bringing attention to a high-profile bill they disagreed with.  For many, many years it was seldom employed but since the 1970s it has been used repeatedly to stop much of the chamber’s work. Both parties have used the filibuster to alter simple “majority rules” bills to supermajority votes, so this is not a partisan issue.  

  • A fitting Veterans Day ceremony

    Veterans Day started early as members of VFW Post 1547 and DAV Post 17 battled the bitter cold to post our National Flags around Veterans’ Park. Elks Lodge 401 hosted a breakfast for Veterans at their local Lodge. At 11 a.m., veterans and community members gathered on Sunday, Nov. 11, to celebrate with local veterans.

    Despite the cold and windy conditions, the determination of our local community to pay tribute and acknowledge those who served, leaving loved ones behind, and those who never returned, leaving broken hearts and memories.

  • Mil Gracias - Nov. 16, 2012

    Aaron Ortega was a lifelong resident of Las Vegas, a son of Juan and Annabella Ortega, and a victim of a rare enzyme disorder called methylmelonic acidemia. Aaron was a person who loved music and always had the desire to start a heavy metal band called Life & Death. His favorite holiday was  Halloween. For those reasons the Aaron Ortega Life & Death Fest has been held on the weekend nearest Halloween.

  • Red tape aside, repaint the line

    I invite the city to follow through on its obligation to repaint the white line leading traffic from Interstate 25 into Las Vegas on Exit 343. I am a citizen here in Las Vegas but if I were not familiar with the exits into Las Vegas, there might be confusion and I might actually miss this exit, especially on a dark night. I have heard other comments on this particular exit.

  • The county’s oil, gas ordinance

    San Miguel County’s draft ordinance regarding oil and gas references the “National Environmental Policy Act” and thus rightly includes all aspects of the biotic and abiotic environment, but unlike the law, fails to include “economics.” Unfortunately this is consistent with membership of the county’s oil and gas committee, which also did not have a specific representative for “economic development.”

  • ‘Envirowackos’ vs. other ‘wackos’

    According to Alan Franken’s letter to the editor published Nov. 2, those of us who oppose hydraulic fracturing, AKA fracking, are “envirowackos.” San Miguel County must be a haven for “envirowackos,” because more than 1,000  San Miguel County residents have already signed a petition demanding a ban on fracking. A recent online petition to ban fracking in San Miguel County has attracted over 1,600 signatures.

  • The road to (S)hell

    In Alan Franken’s Nov. 2 letter, he stated he was “scared” — more of the economic devastation than the known realities of hydraulic fracturing (fracking) for natural gas here. Despite the mounting scientific evidence documenting the toxic effects on livestock, plants and, of course, people in 33 states, some still believe that the boom in the oil-and-gas industry will be a boon for San Miguel County — and, more dangerous, believe there is no down side.  

  • Must address the problem

    I recently read where Las Vegas has the highest homicide rate in New Mexico. That problem must be addressed immediately.

    Local political leaders, religious  leaders, and educators must join together with the local police and community members to create and implement a plan that can remove the negative connotation that goes along with the crime problem. Las Vegas can ill afford the title of the “highest crime rate in the state.”