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Editorials

  • More finger pointing

    It’s ironic that a spokesman for the state Human Services Department is crying foul over an audit commissioned by the state auditor’s office that casts the department in a bad light. Ironic because just eight months ago it was the Human Services Department using an audit that it commissioned to drag 15 behavioral health providers through the mud, effectively accusing those New Mexico businesses of fraud and other misdeeds.

  • Thank you, governor

    We may not always agree with Gov. Susana Martinez, but when it comes to water issues and her staunch support for the city of Las Vegas’ water infrastructure needs, we have nothing but praise for her.

    Back in November, Martinez challenged state lawmakers to set aside $112 million of this year’s capital outlay funds for water and waste water projects across the state. Her reason was obvious.

  • Please vote

    Nearly two months ago, candidates for the municipal judge post and two City Council seats declared their candidacies. Since then, most of them have been going door to door making their cases for your vote.
    Now it’s up to you.
    Tuesday is Election Day. Polls will be open from 7 a.m. to 7 p.m.
    Registered city voters can cast their ballots at either Robertson High School’s Michael Marr Gymnasium or the West Las Vegas High School gym. There is no wrong place to vote.

  • Thumbs Our high country lowdown on the news - Feb. 28, 2014

    THUMBS UP! FINALLY, A DECISION
    We can’t say we’re surprised that the Las Vegas City Schools District and Superintendent Sheryl McNellis-Martinez are parting ways. The writing has been on the wall for months, and, frankly, we’re glad that the board is pursuing new leadership for the district. We’ve heard some grumbling in the community about the board deciding to place McNellis-Martinez on paid leave until her contract expires at the end of this school year. In our view, it’s money well spent if it makes the transition easier for the district.

  • Protecting children

    We’re baffled by the state Legislature’s failure to enact a law that makes it clear that each and every one of us is responsible for reporting child abuse if we’re aware of it.

    Given the recent high-profile child abuse cases that have dominated television newscasts in recent months, we would have though that closing this legal loophole would have been high up on lawmakers’ list of priorities. Sadly, it took a back seat to other matters, and the most vulnerable children in our state may end up paying the price.

  • Gov should rethink choice

    We’re glad that Carl Foster has finally dropped his lawsuit against New Mexico Highlands University.

    But the timing of his decision reeks of political maneuvering and of an attempt on his part to silence criticism over Gov. Susana Martinez’s decision to appoint him to the Highlands Board of Regents. In our view, Foster is still a bad choice for the regents, and we’re glad that his confirmation stalled in the Senate Rules Committee.

    For anyone not familiar with the lawsuit, here’s the short version:

  • Scholarship plan a start

    With New Mexico’s lottery scholarship program running short on cash, the state House has approved a measure to keep the program solvent.

  • Amtrak route worth saving

    It’s no secret that northeastern New Mexico’s economy is struggling. Many businesses throughout the region are fighting for their lives as area cities and villages shrink in population.

    It’s a trend playing out in rural areas across the nation as more people flock to big cities in search of jobs.

    Given the challenges this region is facing, we fail to understand Gov. Susanna Martinez’s lukewarm response to a plan that would keep Amtrak’s Southwest Chief running through the region.

  • Thumbs Our high country lowdown on the news - Feb. 14, 2014

    THUMBS DOWN! END OF AN ERA
    After more than a century in business, Parisian Cleaners is closing its doors for good, and that’s sad news for our community. Owner Charlie Vigil, who began working at the dry-cleaning business 62 years ago, says he has been losing roughly $1,000 a month for the last six months. Besides, he’s 84 years old and says it’s time for him to retire. We hate to see the business close, but there’s no question that Mr. Vigil deserves to rest now.

    THUMBS UP! A LIFE WELL LIVED

  • Luna board erred

    There’s an old saying that actions speak louder than words, and that’s certainly the case with Luna Community College’s Board of Trustees.

    The board voted last week to ease its nepotism rules, which, to some degree, is understandable given how strict they had been. The previous policy prohibited the college from hiring in any capacity a person related to a current board member, administrator or employee of the college.