• Let’s solidify requirements

    Five years after state lawmakers passed legislation that mandates graduation standards for high school students, there’s still confusion about exactly what the new standards are.

    Indeed, superintendents from around the state worry that the changes could prevent thousands of students from graduating, according to The Associated Press. The concerns have prompted the state Public Education Department to delay enforcement of the new rules, allowing school district’s to come up with their own graduation requirements for the current school year.

  • Thumbs Our high country lowdown on the news - Nov. 15, 2013

    We applaud Luna Community College for opening a Veterans Resource Center. The center will help veterans and their family members cut through the red tape required for such things as obtaining educational benefits. Veterans will also get academic and career advisement, along with peer to peer mentoring at the center. Many service members have been returning from wars in Iraq and Afghanistan, and some will need help transitioning back to civilian life. We’re glad to see Luna being a leader in this effort.

  • Outrageous actions

    The right of the people to be secure in their persons, houses, papers, and effects, against unreasonable searches and seizures, shall not be violated, and no warrants shall issue, but upon probable cause, supported by oath or affirmation, and particularly describing the place to be searched, and the persons or things to be seized.
    — Fourth Amendment

    Every one of us should be outraged at the news emerging out of southern New Mexico.

  • A lesson for us all

    If you’ve watched the television news in the past few days or picked up a newspaper, you likely know about Albuquerque Public Schools Superintendent Winston Brooks’ troubles.

    Brooks and state Education Secretary-Designate Hanna Skandera have traded barbs regularly in recent years. At the heart of their dispute is disagreement over how to reform schools in this state.

    But Brooks crossed the line last week when he posted comments on his Twitter account comparing Skandera to a farm animal.

  • Thumbs Our high country lowdown on the news - Nov. 8, 2013

    Luna Community College students are sponsoring a coat drive to help people stay warm this winter. The last day to donate a coat and other items like hats, gloves and scarves is Nov. 22. The items will be distributed on Nov. 23. It’s great to see students getting involved in such a worthy cause. Let’s help them out by looking through our closets and donating the coats we no longer use.


  • Exercising and proselytizing

    One of the most beneficial things a body can do after a solid night’s sleep is to stretch, to kick-start the body into motion.

    Few would argue with that prescription. However, according to one New Mexico lawmaker, you need to be careful what you call it. According to 8th District Rep. Alonzo Baldonado, a Republican, if the stretching takes on the appearance of some yoga motions, that puts the practitioners in danger of getting too close to Eastern religions.

  • Appeals court got it wrong

    The state Court of Appeals missed the boat on its recent ruling about who is required to report suspected child abuse and neglect in New Mexico.

    Their tortured interpretation of the state statute ignores the plain language of the law. Worse yet, it places New Mexico’s children at risk.

    It’s no wonder that both Gov. Susana Martinez and Democratic Attorney General Gary King are both blasting the ruling, telling The Associated Press that it is a foolish decision that puts children in danger.

  • Thumbs Our high country lowdown on the news - Nov. 1, 2013


  • Grading teachers

    New Mexico consistently ranks at or near the bottom compared to other states when it comes to educating our children.

    So it’s clear that business as usual is no longer an option when it concerns our state’s public schools. To their credit, Gov. Susana Martinez and the state Public Education Department realize this, and they’re trying to implement reforms that will make a difference. But they need to rethink their unilateral, top-down approach, which is on the verge of sparking a legal battle with the state’s two teacher unions.

  • Lessons to be learned

    Two teachers were murdered by students within a day of one another last week, once again bringing the issue of school violence to the forefront of the national conversation.

    In Sparks, Nev., a 12-year-old boy took a handgun to his middle school last Monday morning, shot two boys and then fatally shot math teacher Michael Landsberry. The boy then turned the gun on himself, committing suicide.