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Editorials

  • The PRC appointment

    Jerome Block Jr. finally did the right thing, even if it did take considerable pressure from the attorney general’s office to motivate him in that direction. The Public Regulation Commission member agreed to resign his position last week as part of a plea agreement for many of his irresponsible and illegal actions as a “public servant.”

  • Thumbs - Our high country lowdown on the news

    THUMBS DOWN! HOT AND DRY. As summer officially wound down last week (as of last Friday, we’re in autumn), a National Weather Service meteorologist said we’re on track for 2011 being the driest year ever in New Mexico. And one of the hottest, with only the summer of 1980 being worse in the temps category.

  • Tackling bullying

    A recent Associated Press/MTV poll of youth in their teens and early 20s found that most of them — 56 percent — have been the target of some type of online taunting, harassment or bullying. Moreover, according to bullyingstatistics.org, last year about 160,000 children a day missed school out of fear of being bullied. And for many of them, when they weren’t being physically picked on at or near school, they were having to endure cyberbullying — something that can haunt a child day and night, and it’s on the rise.

  • The man with the big heart

    There’s a touch of cruel irony in the fact that Henry Sanchez died of an apparent heart attack. The man, after all, was all heart.

    Sanchez, a former mayor of Las Vegas as well as a legendary New Mexico coach, died last week at the too-young age of 74. He left behind family, friends — and a better world, thanks to his service to God and community.

  • Thumbs - Our high country lowdown on the news

    THUMBS UP! RENEWABLE ENERGY PROJECTS ... A handful of renewable energy projects in New Mexico will be funded through federal grants and loans, according to a recent Associated Press report. In all, more than 500 agricultural producers and rural small businesses across the country are being awarded funds for renewable energy and efficiency projects, with businesses in Deming, Belen, Roswell and Los Lunas getting a piece of the action.

  • Immediate attention

    City officials have every right to be upset over renovation efforts at a public housing project in West Las Vegas — it appears that the contractor, Nambe Construction of Santa Fe, has made a mess of things. And if the company doesn’t act fast to correct the situation, the city will be justified in terminating the contract and looking for someone else to finish the job.

  • West’s policy usurps rights

    The West Las Vegas School Board is flat-out wrong to have passed a policy prohibiting audio or video recordings of its Individual Educational Program (IEP) meetings between educators and parents. It’s unfair to the parents and the students involved; it places the legal interests of the district over the rights of the parents and their children; and it drives a wedge between the educators and the parents who seek what’s best for their kids.

  • Thumbs - Our high country lowdown on the news

    THUMBS DOWN! RADIO THREATS. Let this be a lesson for all who get their hands on a radio used by emergency personnel — don’t mess around with it. The Federal Communications Commissions has announced that it intends to impose a $25,000 fine against a local man who got hold of a police radio and used it in an inappropriate way.

  • Too much for the session

    Maybe New Mexico Gov. Susana Martinez has something in common with former Gov. Bill Richardson after all. Like her predecessor, she likes to pack the legislative agenda.

    But that’s where the comparison is likely to end. Unlike Richardson, it’s hard to imagine Martinez coming anywhere close to accomplishing what she wants during the current special session.

  • Obama, time for ‘drama’

    While we’ve appreciated “no drama Obama” in times past, we were glad to see the president’s demeanor rise to a passionate level last Thursday when he gave his jobs speech. Yes, it was long on rhetoric and short on key specifics, but we applaud the central message he threw out there: A jobs bill is needed now, he’s proposing one that Republicans should vote for, and Washington must act sooner rather than later.