• Editorial: Celebrating rich history

    We are fortunate to live in a place filled with historic homes and buildings.

    Drive down Seventh or Eighth Street, and you’ll see an array of gorgeous Victorian homes that were built by wealthy merchants and other well-to-do residents at the turn of the last century. Go down Douglas Avenue, Bridge Street or around the Plaza, and you’ll see a wide mix of architectural styles that document the rich history of Las Vegas. A stone’s throw away from the Plaza is South Pacific, where modest adobe structures have stood for more than a century.

  • Thumbs Our high country lowdown on the news - Aug. 1, 2014

    The Rough Rider Motorcycle Rally has come and gone, but fortunately the economic benefits of the event will linger on. Motorcyclists spent lots of money this past weekend at local hotels and motels, restaurants, gas stations and assorted other benefits. That spending helps boost our economy. To those who spent countless hours organizing the rally, we thank you.


  • Impressive performance

    Congratulations to the faculty and staff at West Las Vegas’ Union Elementary for their school’s impressive performance on last school year’s standards based assessment.

    State report cards released late last week reveal that 72.9 percent of Union Elementary students scored proficient or better in reading, while 81.4 percent of its students scored proficient or better in math.

    Those rates far exceed the proficiency levels of all other Las Vegas-area schools, and it is certainly something worth celebrating.

  • We need to do better

    The Annie E. Casey Foundation released its annual child well-being report last week.

    The good news: New Mexico no longer ranks dead last in child well-being. The bad news: We’re now 49th in this year’s Kids Count Data Book, an annual national report that grades states on education, health care and poverty.
    While no longer being ranked last is definitely a step forward, ranking second worst among states in child well-being is certainly nothing to celebrate.

  • Thumbs Our high country lowdown on the news - July 25, 2014

    Many in our community were outraged that some lowlife would have the audacity to steal the spear from the beautiful warrior carving in Plaza Park that was recently completed. We can’t imagine that the spear is worth much, so whoever took it likely did it as a prank, and we’re here to tell you it’s not funny. The craftsman who created the carving spent countless hours on the project. For someone to spoil that by walking away with the spear is just plain wrong.


  • We need answers

    It is troubling that a woman was able to walk away with her two children during a supervised visit at the local Children Youth and Families Department office.

    We have to believe that judges don’t strip a parent of custody without having good cause. If anything, judges tend to be reluctant to take that action unless they have proof that a child’s wellbeing is at risk.

  • Require higher GPA

    We are baffled by the criticism that erupts every time one of our state’s universities begins considering increasing its admission standards.
    Regents at New Mexico State University are planning to vote this week on raising the minimum grade point average from 2.5 to 2.75, effective for Fall 2016. Officials at the University of New Mexico are also talking about implementing a similar change there.

  • Thumbs Our high country lowdown on the news - July 18, 2014


  • Rail line crucial to area

    Many people have fond, nostalgic recollections of an era of railroads in their home town. They recall the familiar whistle, waving to riders and — if they’re old enough — the sooty residue that belched out of the line’s smokestacks.

    Residents of the streets closest to the Amtrak line, Railroad, Pecos and Commerce, doubtless remember the coal-operated engines that left ashes in their yards.

  • Thumbs Our high country lowdown on the news - July 11, 2014