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Editorials

  • Help make history again

    Four years ago, at this pre-election moment and in this exact space, we spoke in awe of the presidential election year that was about to conclude. Indeed, 2008 was a year in which the first viable female candidate for president was narrowly bested by the first African-American candidate with a chance to win, while on the other side of the political fence we witnessed the rebirth of a politician whose candidacy had months earlier been declared dead. Then there were the issues — an incredibly unpopular war in Iraq and an economy in peril. We were indeed on the cusp of history.

  • Gross receipts

    Proposals to raise area sales taxes are on San Miguel and Mora county ballots this Nov. 6, and while we think one of them is well worth a “yes” vote, we can’t quite bring ourselves to endorse the other.

  • Constitutional amendments

    Next Tuesday (and this week, as early voting continues through Friday), New Mexico voters will decide on five proposed amendments to the state constitution. Three deal with the state Public Regulation Commission, a powerful state agency in need of some changes, while the other two amendments relate to the state’s system of justice.

    Here’s our recommendation on each of them:

  • Editorial Cartoon - Oct. 31, 2011
  • Bond issues good deals

    Bond A would provide a little more than $10.3 million for capital expenditures for senior centers around the state.

    Bond B would funnel some $9.8 million into public libraries across the state.

    Bond C is the big one. It will allow for $120 million in expenditures for the state’s colleges and universities.

    We’re here to give an enthusiastic “yes” to all three.

  • Thumbs: Our high country lowdown on the news - Oct. 26, 2012

    THUMPS DOWN! ALWAYS GOING UP. The Las Vegas recreation center is raising its rates. As of Nov. 1, swimming in the indoor pool, working out in the gym, getting extended and family passes, and renting equipment will cost more, though recreation director Loretta Martin says they’re still the lowest in the area.
    Even when finances appear to be solid, public facilities are still inclined to raise charges. The increases aren’t too high, but it’s still something we don’t like to see.

  • The debates

    Thankfully, this long and winding campaign to the presidency is about to wrap up, and at the tail end of it all was a little depth. Who won the debates is largely in the eyes of the beholder, but polls  and pundits suggest that former Gov. Mitt Romney took the one that may end up mattering most, the first one, while President Obama won the second and third debates, at least on substance. As for the vice-presidential debate, it appears that most people thought Vice President Joe Biden won on substance and Rep. Paul Ryan won on style.

  • Dumbed down ballots

    The removal of an option in New Mexico to cast a straight party ticket vote with one mark on your ballot has been called into question by a lawsuit brought by the state’s Democratic Party. As of last week, the lawsuit was put on hold by the state Supreme Court while a federal court considers the issue.

  • Thumbs: Our high country lowdown on the news - Oct. 19, 2012

    THUMBS DOWN! TURNING TO CHAPTER 11. With Highlands University and other entities filing suit against Makwa Builders LLC, perhaps a bankruptcy was to be expected. The former-and-fired builder of the university’s student center has filed Chapter 11, putting Highlands and others on hold in efforts to collect on and/or settle disputes with Makwa.
    Did Highlands enter into a contract with a house of cards? If so, it’s worth assessing the situation that led to such a misjudgment.

  • A big leap forward

    It’s one of those events that captures the imagination. Felix Baumgartner took a helium-filled balloon 24 miles up, into the Earth’s stratosphere, and jumped. On the way down he started tumbling, but he corrected his position before it got out of control and ended up hitting Mach 1.24, or 833.9 mph (according to preliminary data). Such a speed made him the first human to break the sound barrier without a jet or rocket-propelled spacecraft.