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Editorials

  • Editorial Roundup - October 11th, 2015

    Compiled by The Associated Press

    Portsmouth Herald (N.H.), on bullying (Sept. 16):

    Bullying among our youth has become a hot button topic the last few years as well-publicized incidents, especially of cyberbullying, resulting in trauma and even suicides by victims have made headlines.

    A new study by the Crimes Against Children Research Center at the University of New Hampshire provides interesting insight into this nasty phenomenon — and lots of hope.

  • Thumbs 10-9-15

    NOBEL PRICE WINNER  IS FROM RATON
    Raton native Paul Modrich, 69, and fellow researchers Thomas Lindahl and Aziz Sancar have been awarded a Nobel Prize for chemistry. The trio’s research explains and maps how the cells repair DNA, a discovery tht helps physicians understand and combat diseases. Modrich said the biological diversity around Raton helped spark his curiosity.

    NICE GOING, MORA

  • Combatting addiction

    Last year was a record year in New Mexico for overdose deaths.

    According to the Albuquerque Journal, 536 New Mexicans died of overdoses in 2014. The figure represents a 19 percent increase over 2013 deaths.

    The paper reported that nearly half of those overdose deaths were the result of prescription opioids or narcotic painkillers like hydrocodone and oxycodone.

    We’ve known for years that prescription drug overdose deaths in our state are high and that something needs to be done to combat the problem.

  • Editorial: Advocating for openness

    “Knowledge will forever govern ignorance; and a people who mean to be their own governors must arm themselves with the power which knowledge gives.”
    —James Madison

    It’s a relatively young organization, but the impact that the New Mexico Foundation for Open Government has had in this state is enormous.

  • Thumbs 10-2-15

    THAT AMAZING ECLIPSE
    It seems as if everybody saw it. Of course, we’re referring to the super lunar eclipse Sunday evening that displayed a blood-red image. Many went to the Highlands Hilton Science-Technology building to look through the university’s telescope. Some gathered around Storrie Lake, Veterans Park, the Wildlife Refuge and Nine-Mile Hill, on NM 518. One curmudgeonly gentleman at Camp Luna grumbled, “Couldn’t they have scheduled the eclipse at a more convenient hour?”

    WHAT’S WITH PEOPLE WHO ABUSE PETS?

  • The Pope’s visit to the U.S.

    Editor’s note: This editorial is from The News & Observer of Raleigh (North Carolina) and was originally published on Sept. 21.

    Those fortunate enough to see Pope Francis on his visit to the United States will know it is a once-in-a-lifetime experience, one they’ll share with friends and family all their lives. And that feeling will apply to non-Catholics as well as members of the church.

  • Campaign promises

    Editor’s note: The following editorial was recently published by the Fairbanks (Alaska) Daily News-Miner.

  • Thumbs 9-25-15

    MAKING ANIMAL WELFARE A PRIORITY

  • Absentee officials

    Imagine a job where you’re paid top dollar, and you continue to receive your paychecks regardless of whether you show up for work.
    New Mexico elected officials don’t have to imagine it because that’s exactly the kind of jobs they have. It’s particularly troubling because elected officials tend to be among the highest paid individuals in our state.

  • Kudos to Highlands

    Gov. Susana Martinez was at Highlands University last week to highlight the innovative things the university is doing to try to boost its low graduation rate.
    The attention is well deserved.
    In an effort to get students to complete their degrees more quickly, Highlands is offering a $1,000 check to each member of the freshman class who completes a bachelor’s degree within four years. Regents also promised members of the freshman class that their tuition will not go up by more than six percent per year for the first four years that they are enrolled.