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Editorials

  • Another DWI tragedy

    Two young girls, a 14-year-old and a 12-year-old, are dead in what state police are calling an alcohol-related crash.

    Police say that 17-year-old Wayne Lovato, of Las Vegas, was driving the vehicle while under the influence of liquor. Lovato, who is being charged with two counts of vehicular homicide and a host of other crimes, deserves to have his day in court.

    But if the preliminary investigation conducted by state police holds up, and if Lovato was indeed driving while drunk, then this community needs to start asking itself some hard questions.

  • Thumbs Our high country lowdown on the news

    A UNANIMOUS DECISION
    It took more than four hours, but when the mayor and Council emerged from their executive session last Wednesday, they appeared to be on the same page on Dodge’s contract, agreeing unanimously that he will continue as city manager for at least the next 14 months. Let’s hope they worked through the issues they have with one another and that the contract represents a fresh start for all of them.

    A BIG PAY HIKE

  • Resignation appropriate

    The sudden and immediate resignation of Mack Crow, president of the local Court Appointed Special Advocates affiliate, calls attention to the function of the organization and, more specifically, to the public stance of individual members.

    To review:
    Members of the children’s advocacy group called a meeting — without Crow — and agreed to demand that the then-president of the organization resign.

    The issue was Crow’s advocacy for a man he described as a personal friend.

  • East finances worrisome

    With three months left in the fiscal year, time is running out for Las Vegas City Schools officials to figure out exactly where the district stands financially, and how it’s going to dig itself out of its financial hole.

    Plugging a large deficit is difficult under the best of circumstances. But when the exact magnitude of the shortfall remains unclear nine months into the fiscal year and when the plan for dealing with that shortfall is mired in vagueness, then the potential for catastrophe looms large.

  • Thumbs: Our high country lowdown on the news - March 29, 2013

    THUMBS UP - OFFERS OF HELP
    A fire destroyed the home of David Martinez, in Sheridan, south of Las Vegas. Immediately, Russell Pacheco, the fire chief, stepped in by agreeing to funnel offers of help to the family. He asks that anyone wishing to help the victims contact him at his office at 518 Valencia or call him at 425-2855. He will put callers in touch with the Martinezes.

    THUMBS DOWN - ON BENDED KNEE

  • Dodge’s contract

    Councilwoman Tonita Gurule-Giron used words like “unacceptable” and “shameful” to describe the automatic two-year contract renewal for the city manager. We agree, although for different reasons.

    We take no issue with City Manager Timothy Dodge’s getting a two-year contract extension.

  • Health care price gouging

    If we had a voice in selecting the next Pulitzer Prize for outstanding investigative journalism, this year we’d nominate Steven Brill and Time magazine for their lengthy, searing special report titled “Bitter Pill: Why Medical Bills Are Killing Us.” It’s an indictment against the cost of health care in America, with first-rate reporting by Brill and courageously published by Time (a mainstream media magazine that gets more than its share of health care-related ads).

  • Thumbs: Our high country lowdown on the news - March 22, 2013

    THUMBS UP! FIESTA DE LA HISPANIDAD. It’s the show that everyone seems to look forward to this time of year. Fiesta de la Hispanidad is this Saturday at Ilfeld Auditorium.
    This is former Highlands professor Sara Harris’ 19th year organizing the spectacular event. Proceeds go into a scholarship fund for Highlands students.

  • Free enterprise prevails

    It’s getting to where Washington D.C.’s manufactured crises are becoming so commonplace that they’re barely cause for concern anymore. Witness the so-called sequester, which began March 1 to a whole lot of media noise while the general public slept through it.

    Despite President Obama’s cries of wolf — calling the sequester a disaster, though that simply didn’t happen — the U.S. economy chugged along en route to a bona fide recovery for reasons having nothing to do with a dysfunctional U.S. government.

  • Score 1 for secrecy

    Pop quiz: What’s the best word to describe lawmakers who espouse a belief in open government, but who vote for a special rule that seeks to cloak their own emails and documents related to public business in secrecy?

    A. Arrogant;
    B. Misguided;
    C. Hypocritical;
    D. Shameful;
    E. All of the above