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Editorials

  • Thumbs: Our high country lowdown on the news - Nov. 16, 2012

    THUMBS UP! INTERNATIONAL DISPLAY. United World College isn’t the only place where you can find international diversity in the Las Vegas area. Take a look at Highlands University and last week’s Gathering of Nationalities event and you’ll see plenty of it.
    What a tremendous advantage our community has, to be able to count among us so many people from so many nations and cultures. Such diversity is an advantage — and something well worth celebrating.

  • Leaving no one behind

    When President Obama spoke on Veterans Day at the Tomb of the Unknown Soldier, he spoke as if the United States never leaves any veteran behind. “We take care of our own,” he said more than once. It was inspirational rhetoric, but it’s not altogether true.

    On the battlefield, a soldier is taught: leave no one behind — it’s something they strive to do even though it’s not always possible. But when soldiers return home, far too often they are left to fend for themselves.

  • Looking over the ‘cliff’

    Now that the 2012 elections are history, President Obama and lawmakers in Washington must turn their attention back to governing.

    Looming on the immediate horizon is the Budget Control Act of 2011, AKA the “fiscal cliff” the nation faces beginning Jan. 1, 2013.

  • Thumbs: Our high country lowdown on the news - Nov. 9, 2012

    THUMBS UP! FINALLY, IT’S OVER. In what goes down in history as the most expensive election in American history (at least until 2016), we breathe a sigh of relief that it’s finally over. According to the Center for Responsive Politics, the total cost of the presidential and congressional campaigns jumped up 7 percent to nearly $5.8 billion, with about $2.5 billion going solely into the presidential campaign. One big reason for the increases: the superPACs.
    Not surprisingly, the previous record for campaign spending was in, you guessed it, 2008.

  • Eliminate the College

    Understand that this is being written before Tuesday’s election results, so we don’t know the outcome at the time of this writing. For all we know, one of them could have won the popular vote but not enough electoral votes, making his opponent the victor in a bifurcated election. It happens — see the 2000 election, when Al Gore won the popular vote and George W. Bush won the Electoral College.

    That’s what we want to write about on this day-after day — that antiquated relic of an 18th century solution called the Electoral College. We’d like to see it dissolved.

  • Help make history again

    Four years ago, at this pre-election moment and in this exact space, we spoke in awe of the presidential election year that was about to conclude. Indeed, 2008 was a year in which the first viable female candidate for president was narrowly bested by the first African-American candidate with a chance to win, while on the other side of the political fence we witnessed the rebirth of a politician whose candidacy had months earlier been declared dead. Then there were the issues — an incredibly unpopular war in Iraq and an economy in peril. We were indeed on the cusp of history.

  • Gross receipts

    Proposals to raise area sales taxes are on San Miguel and Mora county ballots this Nov. 6, and while we think one of them is well worth a “yes” vote, we can’t quite bring ourselves to endorse the other.

  • Constitutional amendments

    Next Tuesday (and this week, as early voting continues through Friday), New Mexico voters will decide on five proposed amendments to the state constitution. Three deal with the state Public Regulation Commission, a powerful state agency in need of some changes, while the other two amendments relate to the state’s system of justice.

    Here’s our recommendation on each of them:

  • Editorial Cartoon - Oct. 31, 2011
  • Bond issues good deals

    Bond A would provide a little more than $10.3 million for capital expenditures for senior centers around the state.

    Bond B would funnel some $9.8 million into public libraries across the state.

    Bond C is the big one. It will allow for $120 million in expenditures for the state’s colleges and universities.

    We’re here to give an enthusiastic “yes” to all three.