.....Advertisement.....
.....Advertisement.....

Editorials

  • Time to clean up our city

    First impressions matter, whether we like it or not.

    Tens of thousands of dollars have been spent promoting Las Vegas and San Miguel County in hopes of drawing tourists here. It’s an important part of our economy, and one that none of us can afford to take for granted, given the fragile state of that economy.

    But what happens when tourists arrive in town only to be greeted by trash strewn all over our streets and parks? Or if they have the misfortune of driving behind a motorist who decides to throw trash out his window?

  • Our criminal justice system

    If you’re charged with a crime in this country, and you can’t afford to hire an attorney to represent you, the state is required to hire one for you.

    It’s so fundamental to the proper functioning of our criminal justice system that the right to an attorney is guaranteed in the constitution.

    Spending taxpayer dollars on criminal defense lawyers for people who are accused of breaking the law isn’t the most popular thing for elected officials to do. But it is the right thing to do.

  • Thumbs Our high country lowdown on the news - May 8, 2015

    THUMBS UP! RIO GALLINAS MOVES INTO NEW HOME

  • Sheehan will be missed

    Michael Sheehan will officially step down as the Santa Fe archbishop in June now that Pope Francis has appointed Salt Lake City bishop John Wester to replace him.

    It’s been nearly 22 years since Sheehan took over as the archbishop, and he told The Associated Press last week that he believes he’s leaving the archdiocese a better place and that there’s more accountability in addressing allegations of abuse.

  • Time to mend rift

    Mora County dodged a bullet last month with the settlement of two federal lawsuits filed over the county’s Community Water Rights and Local Self-Government Ordinance, which attempted to ban all oil and gas drilling in the county.

    A federal judge struck down that ordinance in January after determining that it violated the plaintiffs’ constitutional rights and conflicted with state law. But one of the issues left unresolved was whether Mora County would be forced to pay thousands of dollars in legal fees incurred by the plaintiffs in bringing the lawsuit.

  • Thumbs Our high country lowdown on the news - May 1, 2015

    THUMBS UP! AN INNOVATIVE INCENTIVE
    Highlands University regents voted last Friday to offer incoming freshmen a $1,000 bonus if they graduate from the university within four years. Outgoing President Jim Fries proposed the bonus as a way to provide an incentive to incoming students to complete their undergraduate degrees as quickly as possible. It’s a great deal for students. We hope many of the university’s incoming freshmen earn that bonus and that Highlands’ dismal four-year graduate rate will surge as a result.

  • A bitter pill to swallow

    As lawmakers and the Governor’s Office work behind the scenes to come up with a compromise capital outlay bill, we urge them to consider restoring funding for the Mora County Complex.

    Lawmakers earmarked $1.8 million for the Mora building in the state budget bill, but Gov. Susana Martinez used her line-item veto power to eliminate it. Many of the concerns she expressed in her veto message were certainly valid.

  • Movie script offensive

    An Adam Sandler movie being shot in Las Vegas and other parts of New Mexico is stirring controversy over its portrayal of American Indians.

    Several American Indian actors walked off the set of “The Ridiculous Six” on Wednesday night, complaining about stereotypes, offensive names and scenes they say disrespect Native American religious practices.

  • Thumbs Our high country lowdown on the news - April 24, 2015

    THUMBS UP! $562,000 IN CITY DEBT FORGIVEN
    Kudos to the state Water Trust Board and the city of Las Vegas for changing the terms of the grant/loan agreements for two past water projects. The Water Trust Board had previously given the city a 60 percent grant/40 percent loan for those two projects. Recently, those terms were changed to make the funding 90 percent grant/10 percent loan. The net result is $562,000  in savings for the city utilities department, which can now be used for other water projects.

    THUMBS UP! AN ADVOCATE FOR THE HOMELESS

  • Regents must choose wisely

    Roughly four dozen candidates applied to be Highlands University’s next president, and the Presidential Search Committee has whittled that pool down to six finalists. Now comes the hard part: Figuring out which of those six is the best fit for Highlands.

    It will likely be the most important decision this Highlands Board of Regents will make.

    Selecting the wrong person could set the institution back years — think Manny Aragon and Selimo Rael. By contrast, we’re confident that the institution will thrive if regents select wisely.