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Editorials

  • Thumbs

    UP thumb MISTAKE ADDRESSED PROPERLY. After revelations that the city violated its own ordinance by approving a Chamber of Commerce contract without running it by the Lodgers Tax Board — which had been disbanded earlier this year — the mayor and council took a step back to fix the mistake. A new board has now been named with able-bodied business people on it and the process can now move forward legally.

  • Change and stability

    Las Vegas Mayor Tony Marquez has changed most of the cast of characters at City Hall since taking office nearly four months ago. He immediately hired a new interim city manager and disbanded all city committees. Last month, he brought in a new permanent city manager and dismissed six of the city’s 10 department directors. Citizens voted him in on a change platform, and change they have received.

  • Boomers, race and Vietnam

    Two issues have always haunted Baby Boomers: Vietnam and race. And while significant process has been made on the issue of race, the nation is still arguing over the lessons of the Vietnam War.

    That’s why Barack Obama has a chance to win the presidency even as the nation continues to debate the definition of patriotism.

  • Thumbs - Our high-country lowdown on the news

    VIVAN LA FIESTAS! It’s been a part of Las Vegas for six scores — 120 straight years of celebration the region’s heritage. And it’s in full force today, so grab your folding chairs and head on down to the Plaza for lots of Spanish song and dance, Southwest sun, and maybe a monsoon shower or two. And don’t forget the city fireworks show tonight.

    Enjoy this Fourth of July holiday, everyone — Las Vegas style!

  • Keep officials in the loop

    It’s no secret the Las Vegas City Council has its divisions. Mayor Tony Marquez has two staunch allies, Diane Moore and Andrew Feldman, while the opposition consists of Morris Madrid and Cruz Roybal.

    While many governing bodies prefer to discuss their differences outside public meetings, the City Council historically has carried out many debates in public. And that’s a good thing. After all, aren’t citizens entitled to learn about the pros and cons of issues during spirited public discussions?

  • Rooting for Campos

    It’s an unfortunate reality in Las Vegas politics that some people work hard to bring down their enemies — even at the expense of the larger community. We see and hear it mostly behind the scenes: People rooting for the failure of their adversary after they’ve been elected or selected to lead an institution that’s important to the city’s well being.

  • Fiestas!

    There’s no bigger event for Las Vegas than its July fiestas. And as far as we know, no public event has lasted quite so long.

    Fiestas de Las Vegas, which begins tonight with the reinas pageant, is now 120 years old. Back when it started, in 1888, Las Vegas was a bustling frontier town of sizable proportions, for those days, and New Mexico was still 24 years away from statehood.

  • A lightning rod for change

    In March, Las Vegas voters decided on a change in leadership at City Hall. It was a big change, from a majority that controlled City Hall to the minority opinion that things could be run better. But it pales in comparison to the sweeping changes that came Friday night, when Mayor Tony Marquez declared that there’s a new sheriff in town.

  • Thumbs - Our high-country lowdown on the news

    REASONABLE DISSENSION. Thumbs up. We agree with the majority regarding the Las Vegas City Council’s decision to impose Stage 1 water restrictions but we respect councilor Morris Madrid’s opposition to it at Wednesday’s meeting. Madrid called the decision “a little premature” and argued that the water conservation ordinance doesn’t require council action, since the city manager can take action on it independent of council direction.

  • The Taliban's comeback

    Here comes troubling news out of Afghanistan: Taliban militants are fighting to control several villages in the southern part of the nation so they can put themselves in a position to take back the city of Kandahar, their former spiritual home.