• Another perspective - A worthwhile investment

    By Rebecca Latham

    Recently, I’ve had the opportunity to join Gov. Susana Martinez as she delivers an important message across the Land of Enchantment: Tourism is on the rise and is bringing dollars and jobs to New Mexico.

    For the third straight year, New Mexico saw record-breaking tourism growth, with 32.7 million people traveling our state in 2014. That’s 500,000 more visitors than in 2013, a boost that is exposing more people than ever before to our cultural heritage and unparalleled adventure.   

  • Work of Art: Is Atticus a racist?

    There was a bit of relief when I read a review of a new book that declares that “Go Set a Watchman,” is not a sequel to the 1960s blockbuster novel that became a great movie, “To Kill a Mockingbird.”

    But before proceeding, let me release the long-standing pun regarding the Mexican mixed drink called “Tequila Mockingbird.” There might be some mixicologists who will prepare you a Bloody Mary, or Gin and Tonic or a Hot Toddy, but a Tequila concoction? I don’t think so.

  • Dispatch New Mexico - Gov. Martinez appears to be hitting her stride

    Earlier this year I wrote about Gov. Susana Martinez’s tenuous legacy, saying that, after a little more than four years in office, she has little of consequence to tout as a lasting accomplishment.

    Now, I’m thinking she may have found it in tourism.

    And that’s not all I’ve noticed. She may also be hitting her stride politically, and (maybe, just maybe) with the media.

  • Just a Thought - What is your ‘coachability’ score?

    By Rick Kraft

    Are you coachable? Do you take instruction well? Do you listen to advice from others?

    Are you the smartest person who ever lived? Maybe a better question is, “Are you the smartest person you know?” If so, why would you need to listen to anyone else? If not, why wouldn’t you listen to others?

  • Work of Art: Repeating the same errors

    Don’t be surprised to discover that I’ve used this statement in several past columns: It’s a miracle that anyone learns English. I’m instantly reminded of the song Professor Henry Higgins blurts out early in the movie and play, “My Fair Lady.”

    The professor, a dialectician and grammarian, sings “Why Can’t the English Teach Their Children How to Speak?” as he laments Eliza Doolittle’s use of “aawww” and “gawwn,” a form of Cockney-speak people of that time and place had grown accustomed to.

  • Dispatch New Mexico - The Roswell Incident and pop culture

    Last weekend I experienced my first Cosmicon. That’s cosmic, not comic, aptly named for its interstellar flavor, which was inspired by an incident in 1947 that put Roswell on the international map.

    Cosmicon is an annual event alongside a science fiction film festival and the 20-year-old UFO Festival, which The Alien City puts on every year around the Fourth of July. And it’s all owed to an alleged UFO crash outside Roswell more than a half century ago.

  • Just a Thought - Regrets looking in the rear-view mirror

    By Rick Kraft

    Each of us has today. Each of us will have a last day. These are two certainties I believe both of us can agree on. Two days of significance, one known and one unknown.

    If you knew that today was your last day of life and you were asked by a stranger what has been the biggest regret of your life, what would you say? Honestly, what would you say?

  • Editorial Roundup - July 10, 2015

    Compiled by The Associated Press

    The Poughkeepsie (New York) Journal on improving the Affordable Care Act (July 4):
    Now that the Supreme Court has affirmed another vital aspect of the Affordable Care Act, federal officials should see the wisdom and imperative of improving this complex and important law. They shouldn’t let this matter fester until after the 2016 presidential elections, as they likely are apt to do.

  • Work of Art: Fiction is ‘made-up’ stuff

    I  find it irksome for people to define something only on the basis of what it’s not. Sound confusing? Let me explain.

    I remember way back in fourth or fifth grade at Immaculate Conception School when Sister Mary Espantosa ran us through the reading curriculum by telling us that books were generally divided into two classes: fiction and non-fiction.

  • Dispatch New Mexico - The latest chapter in civil rights

    Americans have seen a lot of civil rights advancements over the past half-century, with a launching point for other causes coming with the modern-day Civil Rights Movement of the 1950s and ‘60s.