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Columns

  • As It Is: Montaño took tough questions

    Ramon “Swoops” Montaño left recently as president of the Las Vegas City Schools board. He was never one to shy away from controversy or avoid people’s calls.

    We should know. The school district has had its share of controversies over the years, yet Montaño has always been accessible to our newspaper. He has spoken with us when it would have been a lot easier for him to get into his bunker.

    Patrick Romero is the other member of the board who has been equally accessible. Phillip Vigil has been available to a lesser extent.

  • Another perspective: Questions that need answers

    The problems which beset the Las Vegas City Schools have had the attention of our community over the past weeks and months. The increases to property taxes certainly arouse the attention of many people.

    Although taxes are important, they don’t however overshadow our responsibility to provide students a quality education in a safe and caring environment.

  • Work of Art: A friend of Elizabeth Edwards

    By Art Trujillo

    Las Vegas Optic

    The world lost a bright, dedicated, articulate woman last week when Elizabeth Ed-wards died of breast cancer. She was the estranged wife of John Edwards, who appeared in Las Vegas in 2004, as the Democratic running mate of John Kerry.

    John Edwards sought the presidential nomination in 2008 but lost to Barack Obama. One person who knew the late Mrs. Edwards well is Kate Lockwood, a nurse and massage therapist from Las Vegas.

  • As it is: Should I set up shop in a bar?

    Maybe I should set up my desk and computer in a local bar. I’d probably get some interesting news tips and have a lot more fun.

    How did this idea get into my head?

    I credit the Las Vegas Fiesta Council, the group that the City Council put out of business a few weeks ago after a number of controversies.
    Angry at its dismissal, the Fiesta Council recently put out an eight-page letter defending itself, e-mailed to scores of people around town, including government officials and leaders in the business community.

  • How did we survive childhood?

    By Art Trujillo

    Martha Johnsen’s morning program on local radio often has quite interesting topics. One morning she discussed childhood games of the past. She invited KFUN listeners to phone in to provide input on what used to occupy them in their youth.


    Johnsen re-called that girls used to play jacks, boys marbles. People called in with accounts of having played Red Rover, Tag, Hide-and-Seek, Hopscotch (without Scotch), and Jump Rope.

  • Fighting government secrecy

    Most people agree that taxpayers have every right to know how their money is being spent.


    But sometimes, the government tries to keep that information from the people.


    Last week, I spent much of a day trying to get the amount of the Las Vegas City Schools’ settlement with a former Robertson High School student who accused her former coach of having sex with her repeatedly.

  • Work of Art: What exactly is a ‘jefito’?

    By Art Trujillo

    Well, I wish I’d had the pleasure. In Thursday’s Journal, I read a detailed obituary for Ruben Cobos, the author of “A Dictionary of New Mexico and Southern Colorado Spanish.”


    For years, we’ve had a copy of the latest revised edition in our house and at work. Cobos, who died last week at age 99, provided quite a service, especially helpful to people like me, who grew up with Spanglish and who as a youngster, just knew that we often speak a different slanguage.

  • Candidates should consider...

    Last week, potential school board members got some tips on what it’s like to serve on a board of education. The training was offered by a relatively new local group, the Community Committee for Better Schools.


    This group deserves credit for taking positive action to make sure we get good folks on our school boards. The elections are in February.
    Some people run because they’re hoping to take someone else off a board. That’s not a good reason for serving the community. One should have a genuine desire to improve our schools.

  • Dulcey Amargo: Tender mercis

    No, mercy, above, is not misspelled. Let me explain. I often “suffer” from language interference, and I love it. Having an extra language or two to rely on makes life more interesting.


    We often use the phrase, “It’s Greek to me,” but that’s not my complaint. It can be Greek, Latin or one of its kin, Spanish, French, or English. It’s all my cup of tea, to use a well-worn cliché.

  • I didn’t say ‘junk’

    By Art Trujillo

    Did John Pistole have the timing down just right? As head of the Transportation Security Administration, he waited . . . and waited for the start of the busiest travel time of the year to surprise air travelers with three options: submit to a full-body screening, agree to an “enhanced” body pat-down or stay home.