.....Advertisement.....
.....Advertisement.....

Columns

  • Nuestra Historia - Port of entry to New Mexico

    By 1801, the population in San Miguel had reached 182, including 85 men and boys, and 97 women and girls, exceeding the 123 residents at the Pecos Pueblo. Soon after, the original and newly arriving settlers  established San José, as already mentioned, and  continued to settle other communities along the Pecos River, including La Cuesta, later named Villanueva, and Las Mulas, Entrañosa, Puertocito, Guzano, Bernal and El Pueblo. These and other communities flourished, and by the early 1830s their combined population exceeded 2,000 people.

  • To the Point: An expensive shellgame

    The outgoing State Higher Education leadership has proposed a plan — kind of — only eight years after a first term Richardson transition team said it was needed.

    The plan has been justifiably panned, but I think the fatal flaw for me is the large and obvious conflict of interest between the authors and those who should be the targets of the plan.

  • Work of Art: He hasn’t been assassinated

    By Art Trujillo

    An exchange, ongoing for years, has caused me to run for the dictionaries, all because of a single word: assassinate.

    Bruce Wertz, a clerk for the Las Vegas City Schools, has assured me he’s still alive by giving me an unusual answer as to his health. I’ll ask, “How you doing, Bruce?”

    Invariably, he replies, “I’m OK. I haven’t been assassinated this week.” Then he tacks this on: “And if I had been, I wouldn’t be telling you about it now.” Really?

  • Publisher’s Note: Flawed heritage

    I remember the day after Martin Luther King was killed just across the Mississippi River from my home-state of Arkansas. I was 11 years old and working for a man raking leaves, and I asked him what he thought about it.

    He said King got what he was asking for.

    And I remember years later, when I was applying for a job in Little Rock and the man interviewing me outlined the holidays I would get — the new King holiday was one, he said, but a lot of the employees preferred to celebrate it as the Confederate Gen. Robert E. Lee’s birthday instead.

  • To the Points: Cheers for WikiLeaks

    Thomas Jefferson once proffered that if he had to choose between an elected congress and a free media to ensure the preservation of democracy, he would roll the presses, every time. The present ballyhoo created by WikiLeaks supports Tom’s thinking and reminds us, once again, just how hard our government works to ensure that we, the citizens, don’t really know what’s happening to our national treasure and our aspirations to become an altruistic, even-handed, fair-thinking member of the global community.

  • Work of Art: Sweatin’ to the newbies

    By Art Trujillo

    It’s around this time of the year when people’s visits to doctors increase. And doctors often say such an increase is expected around the holidays. We overeat.

    ‘Twas the season to gormandize on turkey, ham, mashed potatoes, yams and the full spectrum of Thanksgiving, Christmas and New Year’s edibles.

  • Publisher’s Note: Candidate forums

    Ramon “Swoops” Montaño called last week, relaying a concern he heard about the upcoming school board candidate forums. He wondered if the east-side forum might be skewed in favor of two candidates in particular — Felix Alderete and Ricky Serna — since they are members of the Community Committee for Better Schools.

    That committee is co-sponsoring both forums — for West’s candidates on Jan. 18 and for East’s on Jan. 20 — along with the Optic.

  • To the Point: Resuscitating Marie Antoinette

    I’ve always thought of progressive taxation — the more you make, the more you pay — as a universally advantageous alternative to revolution.

    I recall that I first learned this heretical distinction during my liberal arts education at Highlands, which included reading Montaigne, Bentham, Hume, Locke, Smith and others of their ilk. I don’t know that these stalwarts are still on the required reading lists, but there might be some gain if they were.

  • Work of Art: Tell me model, make, year

    By Art Trujillo

    Las Vegas Optic

    As a child, I’d spend a lot of time waiting for my dad to get off work at B.M. Werley Auto Co., then the Ford Dealership on Grand Avenue.

    I knew all the front-office staff and most of those in the garage. Remember, in those days, new cars were guaranteed to break at least once on being driven for the first time. That kept the backshop full and the crew busy.

  • Publisher’s Note: Enter a new year

    For six years, managing editor David Giuliani occupied this spot on this particular day. But now, dedicated readers of the Optic know, he’s gone. Off to a newspaper in Illinois, where I’m confident he’ll do well.

    Giuliani was the consummate journalist. During his time at the Optic, he reported on the good, bad and ugly of our community without hesitation. I’m convinced that this newspaper and our community is better because of his work and dedication.