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Columns

  • Orgullo del Norte - ‘El Tigre,’ Reies Lopez Tijerina

    “Tijerina was truly the right person, in the right place, at the right time.”
    — Maurilio Vigil, historian

    As a young boy I recall a monument being erected at Apodaca Park in Las Cruces. It was a sculpture representing Native Americans. This event stuck with me because of a comment my father made as we drove by.

    “First they commit genocide on them, and then they build monuments in memory of them,” he said.

  • Wagon Mound’s Romero: Old-school hoops icon

    Editor’s note: This is the fifth of a series of articles written on old-school athletics by Luna Community College sports performance instructor Henry Sanchez.

    By Henry Sanchez
    Special to the Optic

    It is important to know and remember our past because it reflects where we have been, where we are today and where we are going.

  • Work of Art: Can we recover that lost hour?

    Did anyone show up an hour late for church on Sunday? There seems to be a correlation between the beginning of Daylight Saving Time and the number of excuses people conjure up for being an hour late.

  • Publisher's Note: Restoring monetary value

    Once upon a time, if you wanted to read the news in the Las Vegas Optic, you had to actually buy the paper.

    Then the Internet came along and the Optic went online. Then, suddenly, the hard work of our newsroom could be read for free.

    It’s a credit to the quality of our product and services (and an indication that many of our readers still prefer to read hardcopy editions) that we’ve managed to hold on tight to our subscription base.

  • Blooming Point of View: Making the right mistakes

    I used to believe mistakes get you nowhere. That was before I made all the right ones.

    When I started high school, in the fall of 2009, I had my eyes set on just one class. Unfortunately, as a freshman at Robertson, I became prisoner to the Freshman Academy, and journalism, the class I wanted most, wasn’t one of my elective choices.

  • Nuestra Historia - Las Vegas after Kearny

    After the 1846 occupation and annexation, New Mexico was brought under the civil law of the United States (Kearny Code), and government officials for New Mexico were immediately appointed by Gen. Kearny. Thereafter, New Mexico was governed by civil and military officials who received their appointments from Washington.  

    Thus began New Mexico’s territorial period, which lasted 66 years, until our old and venerable Nuevo Mexico, long a  Spanish and Mexican province, was admitted to the Union as the 47th state in 1912.

  • Orgullo del Norte - The great women of el norte

    “We cannot seek achievement for ourselves and forget about progress and prosperity for our community ....Our ambitions must be broad enough to include the aspirations and needs of others, for their sakes and for our own.”
    — Cesar Chavez

    Women have always played a very large role in history but have received little or no recognition. It will be a crime if we do not honor our own “Norteñas.”

  • Work of Art: As easy as falling off a pie

    Only a couple of weeks away from spring, we’ve gotten restless, tired of checking the weather reports to discover whether traffic’s stuck in Glorieta Pass. Newcomers to this area are often surprised that there’s actually visibility, sun and clear roads after trudging along, following a million semis crawling on I-25. We’ve stayed home more than we’re accustomed to, due to the weather, and we’ve acquired cabin fever.

  • Publisher's Note: Mayoral speculation

    Here’s some premature speculating on next year’s mayoral election, already a hot topic among at least a few Las Vegas political animals.

    I’ve heard eight names thrown into the mix, and having spoken with nearly all of them, can announce the intentions of two in particular.

  • Lawmaker’s Perspective - Budget cuts can be repaired

    The budget cuts under consideration during the current legislative session are a painful continuation of cuts we’ve made for the last several years. But the recession that has forced these cuts is ending and there is hope that critical services can be restored as early as this fall.