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Columns

  • Nuestra Historia - Luis María Cabeza de Baca claimed Las Vegas

    By Jesus L. Lopez

    For the Optic

    Sometime in 1820, Luis María Cabeza de Baca traveled from his home in Peña Blanca to Santa Fe, and then to San Miguel del Bado. Don Luis, as he was known, was apparently looking to expand the already large land holdings he owned in Peña Blanca, which is located in Sandoval County, west of La Bajada. In San Miguel he heard about lush and expansive pasture lands located along a river to the northeast, and he joined eight others from San Miguel in filing an application for a grant of those verdant vegas.

  • Editorial Roundup - April 11, 2014

    Compiled by The Associated Press
    The Free Press of Mankato on the Supreme Court’s recent campaign finance decision (April 4):
    The U.S. Supreme Court ruling that struck down limits on aggregate campaign contributions for individual donors likely left many voters disheartened that once again their influence in representative democracy was further eroded.
    The ruling makes it easy to conclude that money talks in our constitutional democracy and the Supreme Court just gave wealthy donors a megaphone.
    We hope voters and non-voters see it differently.

  • Editorial Cartoon - April 9, 2014
  • Work of Art: But you ordered taquitos

    For a man who’s younger than I and who doesn’t make a posh living through the manipulation of language, Mayor Alfonso Ortiz appears to have broad knowledge of terms we use in Spanish and English.

    He said that “some day” we’d get together, where he could brief me on terms his and my ancestors used in their prime.

    A while back, I’d written about the diminution of terms in Spanish, used by my parents, especially Mom.

  • Another Perspective - What does Gov Martinez have against unions?

    By Ellen Bernstein

    If you haven’t heard by now, Susana Martinez is trying to prevent public sector unions from collecting membership dues.

    The governor’s conversation may be about dues, but the deeper context is about something much greater: the existence of unions, the right to organize and workplace democracy.

  • Nuestra Historia - San Miguel was Port of Entry to New Mexico

    By Jesus L. Lopez

    For the Optic

  • Editorial Roundup - April 4, 2014

    Compiled by The Associated Press

    The Dallas Morning News on religious freedom challenge to Affordable Care Act (March 30).

    Religious freedom is a personal freedom, not an employer choice
    It is hard to imagine anyone, from conservative to liberal, who would want their employer’s religious beliefs imposed on their workforce or insurance coverage. Religious freedom is a personal freedom, not an employer choice.

  • Work of Art: Is it a couch, divan, sofa?

    “Moooonnn River, wider than 1) a mile, 2) the Nile. Well, thanks my listening to trivia on Martha Johnson’s early show on KFUN, I know the answer: It’s No. 1 above, and my miss was wider than a mile.

    In my medieval torpor upon waking a few days ago, I heard a radio conversation with a caller about how easily we misunderstand lyrics to songs, in this case Nile and mile, but I wasn’t awake enough to let it register.

  • Another Perspective - One-dimensional healthcare

    With a doctor in the family, I’ve learned some interesting things about our current approach to healthcare. I must mention that the following is based on conversations with three doctors and information from just one healthcare insurance company though I’m told others are doing similar things.

  • Nuestra Historia - We settled San Miguel del Bado

    By Jesus L. Lopez

    Editor’s note: This column first appeared in the Optic on Jan. 14, 2011.

    In their petition seeking to secure the San Miguel del Bado Land Grant in 1794, the 52 colonists stated as their primary reason that there was not sufficient water in Santa Fe to sustain the growing population and livestock there. (It appears that drought and an adequate water supply were problems even then.) The petitioners also stated that many of them owned small parcels of land in Santa Fe, but they were not sufficient to support their large families.