.....Advertisement.....
.....Advertisement.....

Columns

  • Publisher's Note: Politics and hiring at Luna

    A few hours before a scheduled Luna Community College Board of Trustees meeting on Oct. 20, I heard a rumor that the board was about to remove Pete Campos as president. Some board members were not happy about being left out of certain hiring decisions, I was told, and they had the votes to fire Campos.

  • Nuestra Historia - Starvation Peak; Pablita’s conclusion

    An old and intriguing legend is that Spanish settlers, pursued by hostile Native Americans, took refuge and starved atop El Cerrito de Bernal, a small butte rising 7,031 feet, about 12  miles southwest of Las Vegas. As a result, since anyone can remember, the small mesa has been called Starvation Peak.  (Cerrito means small mountain, and the first written reference to El Cerrito de Bernal was in  1794,  in the description of the San Miguel del Bado land grant, which designates the butte as the grant’s northeastern boundary.)

  • Another Perspective: Back to my hometown

    Editor’s note: This article was originally published on www.YourLifeIsATrip.com, a group blog featuring experiential storytelling and first-person travel narratives.

    I had lived in Santa Fe for 23 years before it occurred to me to offer to move back to Las Vegas, where I was raised, to help out my mom.

  • Work of Art: Halloween: Hit or myth

    This week is the best time of the year. Other seasons are great, but nothing beats the first weeks of fall.

    Halloween features long nights and short days, and the probability that imaginations become bizarre. Most people like to be scared, and Halloween’s a perfect occasion for that.

    Here’s why this season is great:

    Things change. We leave the house early, often needing to scrape our windshields. We don a coat because of the icy car seats, but by the time we arrive at work, it’s time to turn on the AC.

  • Publisher's Note: Collective memories

    Last month’s 10th anniversary of 9/11 got me to thinking about the national experiences that get etched into our collective memory. The ones in which we personally remember where we were and what we were doing when we first heard the news.

  • Nuestra Historia - La Gavilla de Silva

    Vicente Silva came to  Las Vegas in 1875 from Bernalillo, in Sandoval County. He soon opened, on the south plaza, a saloon and gambling house known as the Imperial Saloon. Silva’s wife Telésfora and her brother Gabriel Sandoval helped run the raucous saloon, which was open round-the-clock.

  • Work of Art: They gave it to she and I

    Martha Johnsen often poses questions on tricky grammar issues.

    Monday, on her morning radio program, she asked which of the two is correct: “He and his wife” or “Him and his wife”?

  • Publisher's Note: Protests and movements

    Late last week, as soon as I read that more “Occupy” protests were being organized in New Mexico, including one each in Taos and Santa Fe, I immediately wondered why one has yet to take place here in Las Vegas.

    After all, we’re about as left-wing a town as you’ll find in this state, so why are protests being staged elsewhere but not here?

  • Nuestra Historia - ‘Lynch the Wind Mill’

    A harmless windmill was erected over a water well at the east side of the Old Town Plaza in 1876, across from the present day Parish Hall. The frame windmill rose about 40 feet above ground, and wooden ladders were used to reach both the lower platform and the derrick.

  • Work of Art: We mustn’t exaggerate

    My mommy told me a hundred million times not to exaggerate. But I continue to do so. When something is outrageously expressed, we can always say, “Well, you ought to know I was exaggerating, deliberately.”
    For example, when we say, “We’ve been waiting for hours for Amtrak to arrive ...“ (Well, that would be accurate.) Let’s say instead, “We’ve been waiting for hours for the Rail Runner.” That’s an exaggeration.