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Columns

  • Work of Art: This water’s not pottable

    Even a close member of my family struggles with the potable/pottable issue. Which is it?
    You’ve perhaps read about the almost-give-away prices of effluent water in the city. If you’re among the purchasers of recycled water, you’ve seen and been a part of a small army of vehicles that line up at the treatment plant south of town to buy 1,000 gallons of used water for $1.25.

  • Publisher's Note: Still learning my history

    One of the first things I did when I came to Las Vegas was to read up on the area’s history. I boned up on the gloriously rowdy history of Las Vegas, from the conflicts that the Spaniards had with the local natives, to the assimilation of Jewish families who migrated in on the Santa Fe Trail, to the intrusion of those who came in on the railroad that landed about a mile east of the original settlement. I learned that this town has Spanish, Mexican, European and American roots that created both an embattled and a diverse people.

  • Tragic end to a life

    The shock and sorrow spread throughout my beloved Mora County like a tsunami this week. John Harrington, our dear friend and neighbor to many, was tragically killed while riding his bicycle on N.M. 105 on Monday.

    A service will be held for him at 2 p.m. today (Friday) at the Pendaries Community Center. John, 49, was bicycling westbound on the road two or three miles east of Pendaries at about 5:30 p.m. when a vehicle driven by Calvin Postoak — a Fort Worth, Texas, man who lives part-time in Pendaries — struck him.

  • Nuestra Historia - El Distrito de las Escuelas: The Jesuits

    In September 1874, five years after the arrival of the Sisters of Loretto, an order of Italian Jesuits from Naples came to  Las Vegas and established a private school for boys.  

  • Orgullo del Norte - Gettysburg of the West

    “If I owned Texas and Hell, I’d rent out Texas and live in Hell.”
    — Gen. Phillip H. Sheridan

    The Battle of Glorieta was not called the Gettysburg of the West because of the large number of casualties. It was compared to the Battle of Gettysburg because it just may have determined the outcome of the Civil War.

    Had the Confederates from Texas reached California, they would have had an entire coastline of blockade-free ports and all the gold they needed to finance their army.

  • Work of Art: Let’s do the Jeffersonian Rock

    My favorite dance — there can be no doubt — is the Elevator Dance. It has no steps. And the second favorite, a bit more complicated, is the Y- Dance. The idea here is to escort an attractive woman to the middle of the dance floor, put your arms around her and ... Y Dance?

    Any attempt at fancy footwork on my part might lead to an appearance on Dancing to the Stares, as my tripping would be more fantastic than light.

    Let me explain:

  • Publisher's Note: Ignoring problems

    America is a leader on the world stage. Sometimes. Other times, we just won’t budge.

    Here are three issues we refuse to address, even though we give plenty of lip-service to each:

    1. We fool ourselves into thinking that because we have the greatest health care system for those who can afford it, we must have the greatest health care — even though thousands upon thousands of people regularly fall through the cracks.

  • Another Perspective: Addressing domestic abuse

    “Prominent resident beaten to death.”       

     “Prominent” was the word that stood out to me reading this headline in the April 6 edition of the Las Vegas Optic. The second jolt was a photo of Sherry Anne Clancy, a woman I knew.  

  • Nuestra Historia - El Distrito de las Escuelas: The Sisters of Loretto

    An organized system of formal education in New Mexico was non-existent until the late 1800s. In fact, when Gov. Albino Pérez proposed a tax levy in 1837 to help fund a system of public education, he was more than just rebuffed — he was beheaded.

  • Orgullo del Norte - The train and the first movemento of El Norte

    “History is a great teacher. Now everyone knows that the labor movement did not diminish the strength of the nation but enlarged it. By raising the living standards of millions, labor miraculously created a market for industry and lifted the whole nation to undreamed of levels of production. Those who attack labor forget these simple truths, but history remembers them.”
    — Dr. Martin Luther King Jr.