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Columns

  • Nuestra Historia - El Distrito de las Escuelas: The Jesuits

    In September 1874, five years after the arrival of the Sisters of Loretto, an order of Italian Jesuits from Naples came to  Las Vegas and established a private school for boys.  

  • Orgullo del Norte - Gettysburg of the West

    “If I owned Texas and Hell, I’d rent out Texas and live in Hell.”
    — Gen. Phillip H. Sheridan

    The Battle of Glorieta was not called the Gettysburg of the West because of the large number of casualties. It was compared to the Battle of Gettysburg because it just may have determined the outcome of the Civil War.

    Had the Confederates from Texas reached California, they would have had an entire coastline of blockade-free ports and all the gold they needed to finance their army.

  • Work of Art: Let’s do the Jeffersonian Rock

    My favorite dance — there can be no doubt — is the Elevator Dance. It has no steps. And the second favorite, a bit more complicated, is the Y- Dance. The idea here is to escort an attractive woman to the middle of the dance floor, put your arms around her and ... Y Dance?

    Any attempt at fancy footwork on my part might lead to an appearance on Dancing to the Stares, as my tripping would be more fantastic than light.

    Let me explain:

  • Publisher's Note: Ignoring problems

    America is a leader on the world stage. Sometimes. Other times, we just won’t budge.

    Here are three issues we refuse to address, even though we give plenty of lip-service to each:

    1. We fool ourselves into thinking that because we have the greatest health care system for those who can afford it, we must have the greatest health care — even though thousands upon thousands of people regularly fall through the cracks.

  • Another Perspective: Addressing domestic abuse

    “Prominent resident beaten to death.”       

     “Prominent” was the word that stood out to me reading this headline in the April 6 edition of the Las Vegas Optic. The second jolt was a photo of Sherry Anne Clancy, a woman I knew.  

  • Nuestra Historia - El Distrito de las Escuelas: The Sisters of Loretto

    An organized system of formal education in New Mexico was non-existent until the late 1800s. In fact, when Gov. Albino Pérez proposed a tax levy in 1837 to help fund a system of public education, he was more than just rebuffed — he was beheaded.

  • Orgullo del Norte - The train and the first movemento of El Norte

    “History is a great teacher. Now everyone knows that the labor movement did not diminish the strength of the nation but enlarged it. By raising the living standards of millions, labor miraculously created a market for industry and lifted the whole nation to undreamed of levels of production. Those who attack labor forget these simple truths, but history remembers them.”
    — Dr. Martin Luther King Jr.

  • Work of Art: Fonazo on el treadmill

    Trinidad Martinez, mentioned in this space a while back, took on ethnographic research for a linguistics class he took a few years ago when Prof. Carol Scates chaired the Highlands University English Department.

    A native of nearby Peñasco, Martinez came up with an impressive list of words which we Spanish speakers in northern New Mexico have adopted. Surely, anyone familiar with the Spanish language has come across any number of words that we’ve somehow made fit.

  • Publisher's Note: Board must prove itself

    When it comes to politics in Las Vegas, the public is always suspicious. A lot of people distrust their elected officials, and they are often justified in their reasons.

    Las Vegas’ history is rife with shady dealmaking,  and often the result has been an accumulation of wealth and power into the hands of a few, while the “rank and file” are left wondering what happened.

  • Nuestra Historia - Temple Montefiore and the Taicherts

    By the late 1800s the Jewish presence in Las Vegas was robust and thriving, with the largest population of German Jews in all New Mexico. Most had become successful merchants and had been joined by extended family members emigrating from their old home lands in western Europe.