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Columns

  • Publisher's Note: Teenagers: Mixed blessing

    I consider myself an authority on teenagers, even if they consider me an old geezer.
    Believe it or not, I was a teenager myself for several years. Now I’m the father of two teenagers, who have teenage friends who visit my house, eat my food and take away my nights of peaceful slumber.

  • Nuestra Historia - Placitas grew with Las Vegas

    Soon after its founding in 1835, other settlements flourished around Las Vegas, the earliest of these along the Gallinas River south and east of our town.

    These placitas were self-sustaining villages and hamlets, whose early settlers farmed and ranched, many irrigating off the Gallinas River. Most had their own church and cemetery, many of which still exist, and several boasted a general store and, in later years, a post office.  

  • Orgullo del Norte - The Great Depression, traditions and culture

    “Tradition means giving votes to the most obscure of all classes, our ancestors. It is the democracy of the dead. Tradition refuses to submit to that arrogant oligarchy who merely happen to be walking around.”
    — G. K. Chesterton

    The stock market crashed on Oct. 29, 1929. This day became known as Black Tuesday. Wall Street executives and bankers were jumping to their deaths as the masses were being stripped of their savings.

  • Work of Art: Lawn belched, gave thanks

    Going to the plant south of town, on my first trip for a water haul, I counted 18 vehicles, going for or having gotten, a load of effluent water.

    My grandson and namesake, thrilled over his brand-new learner’s permit, took the wheel, while my wife, Bonnie, and I went along for the ride. Arthur’s father recently purchased a 275-gallon container, which surprisingly took only about a minute to fill. We saw pickups the size of ours, some with trailers, as well as huge tankers.

  • Publisher's Note: Festivals, fairs and parades

    It seems as if every town in the good ol’ U.S.A. has some sort of festival. I’ve been to a number of them.

    In Conway, Ark., where I lived and worked for several years, there was Toad Suck Daze, named after a rural area on the banks of the Arkansas River where, legend has it, people would go to suck on bottles of booze “until they swelled up like toads.” The festival has nothing to do with Toad Suck — the closest it comes to the name itself are the toad races — but the name itself has drawn national attention to the festival.

  • Nuestra Historia - The Jesuit College — Part II

    Instruction at the Jesuit College was offered concurrently in both Spanish and English, perhaps making the school one of the first in the country to establish a bilingual curriculum.  

  • Orgullo del Norte -Statehood and the Spanish-American War

    “A patriot must always be ready to defend his country against his government.”
    — Edward Abbey

    When the American Revolution took place, a large group of people declared war on their home country, their own government, and their fellow countrymen. All those who took up arms against Britain were not called traitors or rebels; they were called “patriots.” This act set the historical bar for what it means to be a patriot.

  • Work of Art: This water’s not pottable

    Even a close member of my family struggles with the potable/pottable issue. Which is it?
    You’ve perhaps read about the almost-give-away prices of effluent water in the city. If you’re among the purchasers of recycled water, you’ve seen and been a part of a small army of vehicles that line up at the treatment plant south of town to buy 1,000 gallons of used water for $1.25.

  • Publisher's Note: Still learning my history

    One of the first things I did when I came to Las Vegas was to read up on the area’s history. I boned up on the gloriously rowdy history of Las Vegas, from the conflicts that the Spaniards had with the local natives, to the assimilation of Jewish families who migrated in on the Santa Fe Trail, to the intrusion of those who came in on the railroad that landed about a mile east of the original settlement. I learned that this town has Spanish, Mexican, European and American roots that created both an embattled and a diverse people.

  • Tragic end to a life

    The shock and sorrow spread throughout my beloved Mora County like a tsunami this week. John Harrington, our dear friend and neighbor to many, was tragically killed while riding his bicycle on N.M. 105 on Monday.

    A service will be held for him at 2 p.m. today (Friday) at the Pendaries Community Center. John, 49, was bicycling westbound on the road two or three miles east of Pendaries at about 5:30 p.m. when a vehicle driven by Calvin Postoak — a Fort Worth, Texas, man who lives part-time in Pendaries — struck him.